Research Topic

Does the Golgi Complex Enable Oncogenesis?

About this Research Topic

The Golgi apparatus is a central organelle of the mammalian secretory pathway. As it is oft-repeated, the Golgi apparatus (and secretory pathway) is responsible for producing, processing and positioning of nearly one-third of the proteome, and thus is a primary organizer of the mammalian cell. In fact, the Golgi complex is a key hub for protein and lipid glycosylation. Moreover, most of the cellular membrane is assembled in the Golgi apparatus. Thus, it is the central sorting center of the cell where both biosynthetic and endocytic pathways intersect and plays an important role in intracellular signaling and homeostasis of several membrane-bound organelles. Given its importance in building a cell and maintaining its homeostasis, does it contribute to conditions where this homeostasis is impaired/altered – as in cancer? The answers have been variable due to its basic house-keeping role, to Golgi processes, such as glycosylation being a hallmark of cancer.

In this Research Topic, we aim to address various aspects of Golgi function, including the fundamental physiological properties of the Golgi complex as a basis to examine whether there is a secretory capability that is acquired by some cancer types that becomes fundamental for carcinogenesis. While cancer-associated alterations of secretory pathway activities, cancer-associated secretome, and even oncoproteins localized at the Golgi have been demonstrated by numerous studies, we still lack knowledge on how the secretory pathway activity leads to carcinogenesis. At the same time, numerous publications suggest that secretory pathway alterations are prevalent in cancer, and even if not a hallmark by themselves, they may enable the acquisition of cancer hallmarks. Here, we have joined a group of experts in the field to critically evaluate the available evidence connecting the Golgi complex to cancer. We wish to achieve two goals: 1) to examine the available evidence to evaluate the strength of the link between the Golgi complex and cancer and 2) to identify potential strong leads and fruitful avenues to pursue for studying the contributions of Golgi associated processes to cancer.

Original Research and Review articles addressing the following topics are welcome:

Golgi structure and function
• Mechanisms and regulation of Golgi complex structure and function
• Localization and sorting of glycosyltransferases.
• Localization and sorting of lipid biosynthetic enzymes in the Golgi
• Transport, modification, and sorting of cargo through the Golgi apparatus

Golgi in cell physiology and cancer-related processes
• Role of Golgi structural reorganizations in cell division and migration
• Control of glycan processing and implications in cell physiology and pathology
• Golgi mediated protein- and lipid-glycosylation in signaling and cancer-related processes
• Golgi membranes as a relay station of intracellular signaling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The Golgi apparatus is a central organelle of the mammalian secretory pathway. As it is oft-repeated, the Golgi apparatus (and secretory pathway) is responsible for producing, processing and positioning of nearly one-third of the proteome, and thus is a primary organizer of the mammalian cell. In fact, the Golgi complex is a key hub for protein and lipid glycosylation. Moreover, most of the cellular membrane is assembled in the Golgi apparatus. Thus, it is the central sorting center of the cell where both biosynthetic and endocytic pathways intersect and plays an important role in intracellular signaling and homeostasis of several membrane-bound organelles. Given its importance in building a cell and maintaining its homeostasis, does it contribute to conditions where this homeostasis is impaired/altered – as in cancer? The answers have been variable due to its basic house-keeping role, to Golgi processes, such as glycosylation being a hallmark of cancer.

In this Research Topic, we aim to address various aspects of Golgi function, including the fundamental physiological properties of the Golgi complex as a basis to examine whether there is a secretory capability that is acquired by some cancer types that becomes fundamental for carcinogenesis. While cancer-associated alterations of secretory pathway activities, cancer-associated secretome, and even oncoproteins localized at the Golgi have been demonstrated by numerous studies, we still lack knowledge on how the secretory pathway activity leads to carcinogenesis. At the same time, numerous publications suggest that secretory pathway alterations are prevalent in cancer, and even if not a hallmark by themselves, they may enable the acquisition of cancer hallmarks. Here, we have joined a group of experts in the field to critically evaluate the available evidence connecting the Golgi complex to cancer. We wish to achieve two goals: 1) to examine the available evidence to evaluate the strength of the link between the Golgi complex and cancer and 2) to identify potential strong leads and fruitful avenues to pursue for studying the contributions of Golgi associated processes to cancer.

Original Research and Review articles addressing the following topics are welcome:

Golgi structure and function
• Mechanisms and regulation of Golgi complex structure and function
• Localization and sorting of glycosyltransferases.
• Localization and sorting of lipid biosynthetic enzymes in the Golgi
• Transport, modification, and sorting of cargo through the Golgi apparatus

Golgi in cell physiology and cancer-related processes
• Role of Golgi structural reorganizations in cell division and migration
• Control of glycan processing and implications in cell physiology and pathology
• Golgi mediated protein- and lipid-glycosylation in signaling and cancer-related processes
• Golgi membranes as a relay station of intracellular signaling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

10 October 2020 Abstract
07 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

10 October 2020 Abstract
07 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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