Research Topic

The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Protective Immunity

About this Research Topic

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) result from the partial reduction of oxygen and encompass both radical and non-radical species. The radical species such as superoxide anion (O2•-), hydroxyl radical (OH), and nitric oxide (NO)) differentiate from the non-radical products like ...

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) result from the partial reduction of oxygen and encompass both radical and non-radical species. The radical species such as superoxide anion (O2•-), hydroxyl radical (OH), and nitric oxide (NO)) differentiate from the non-radical products like H2O2, as they have unpaired electrons. Primary radical species are involved in different physiological/pathophysiological signaling and biological processes. H2O2, for example, can modulate gene expression at the epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels. Moreover, ROS are critical for many forms of cell death, initiated by highly reactive secondary species formed upon reaction of the primary species with themselves or with metal ions. Due to their pleiotropic action, ROS are critically important for cell biology, organ function, and system physiology.

ROS have been implicated in many aspects of the immune response to pathogens. They have been proposed to be the common determinant of the inflammasome activation critical in the inflammatory process which is determinant for an efficient immune response. ROS are also essential for pathogens killing by phagocytic cells as illustrated by chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited disorder of the NADPH oxidase characterized by recurrent and severe bacterial and fungal infections. Moreover, ROS are also required for full activation of lymphocytes as well as for the regulation of immunity mediated by the myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC).

This Research Topic aims to give an update of the contribution of Reactive Oxygen Species in immunity, focusing on different aspects of the immune response as well as immune system pathologies. We welcome the submission of Original Research articles, Reviews, Mini-Reviews, to cover the following topics:

1. ROS and immune cell development and differentiation
2. ROS and immune cell activation, maturation and effector function
3. ROS in inflammation and protective immunity
4. ROS and immunopathology, biomarker and diagnostic
5. Redox modulations as therapeutic intervention


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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2021 Manuscript
31 May 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2021 Manuscript
31 May 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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