Research Topic

New Developments in Understanding Brain and Cerebromicrovascular Aging: Toward Prevention of Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease

About this Research Topic

Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are the most common cause of death among older people in the United States, accounting for approximately 1/3 of all deaths in the US at the age of 65, and nearly 2/3 at an age of 85. With a projected increase in the number of adults over 65 years old increasing from 12 % to 22% in the next 30 years, addressing age related vascular diseases is of critical importance, as the annual cost to care for these older people are projected to more than double over that time. Aging in the brain is characterized by a vast array of functional and structural alterations of the microcirculation, contributing to the pathogenesis of range of age-related diseases including vascular cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, and mild cognitive impairment.

This Research Topic highlights the recent growing interest and understanding of the role of the aging vasculature, in the context of the age-related loss of cognitive function. The goal of this collection is to stimulate and gather evidence that relates to the mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative disease of aging.

We invite submission of original research articles, opinion papers and review articles related to basic and translational geroscience research, focused on:
• understanding the complex relationships between brain and cerebrovascular aging, and pathogenesis of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD).
• the role of shared cellular and molecular mechanisms of aging in age-related functional and phenotypic changes in the brain and the cerebral microcirculation, and their contribution to the pathogenesis of VCI, MCI and AD.
• development of innovative strategies to target shared molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging (i.e. biomarkers) for prevention/treatment of VCI, MCI and AD.
• exploring the links between lifestyle-related factors (e.g., diet, exercise, smoking, chronobiological disruption), medical treatments (e.g. cancer treatments), exposure to environmental toxicants and accelerated brain and cerebromicrovascular aging.
• relevant translational and public health aspects of cerebrovascular and brain aging research.


Keywords: cerebrovasculature, vascular cognitive impairment, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, Brain aging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are the most common cause of death among older people in the United States, accounting for approximately 1/3 of all deaths in the US at the age of 65, and nearly 2/3 at an age of 85. With a projected increase in the number of adults over 65 years old increasing from 12 % to 22% in the next 30 years, addressing age related vascular diseases is of critical importance, as the annual cost to care for these older people are projected to more than double over that time. Aging in the brain is characterized by a vast array of functional and structural alterations of the microcirculation, contributing to the pathogenesis of range of age-related diseases including vascular cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, and mild cognitive impairment.

This Research Topic highlights the recent growing interest and understanding of the role of the aging vasculature, in the context of the age-related loss of cognitive function. The goal of this collection is to stimulate and gather evidence that relates to the mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative disease of aging.

We invite submission of original research articles, opinion papers and review articles related to basic and translational geroscience research, focused on:
• understanding the complex relationships between brain and cerebrovascular aging, and pathogenesis of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD).
• the role of shared cellular and molecular mechanisms of aging in age-related functional and phenotypic changes in the brain and the cerebral microcirculation, and their contribution to the pathogenesis of VCI, MCI and AD.
• development of innovative strategies to target shared molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging (i.e. biomarkers) for prevention/treatment of VCI, MCI and AD.
• exploring the links between lifestyle-related factors (e.g., diet, exercise, smoking, chronobiological disruption), medical treatments (e.g. cancer treatments), exposure to environmental toxicants and accelerated brain and cerebromicrovascular aging.
• relevant translational and public health aspects of cerebrovascular and brain aging research.


Keywords: cerebrovasculature, vascular cognitive impairment, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, Brain aging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2020 Abstract
31 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2020 Abstract
31 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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