Research Topic

Neuropeptide GPCRs in Neuroendocrinology

About this Research Topic

Neuropeptides are the largest and most diverse class of neuromediators in the central and peripheral nervous systems. They play a pivotal role in the control of a vast array of biological functions such as feeding, reproduction, development, growth, learning, nociception, sleep, stress coping, thermoregulation, osmoregulation, and multiple behaviors. Most neuropeptides exert their activities through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are the largest family of cell membrane receptors. Neuropeptide signaling is phylogenetically conserved throughout the animal kingdom from cnidarians to humans. Not surprisingly, neuropeptides and their GPCRs are implicated in a number of pathologies including obesity, infertility, stunting, pain, narcomepsy, diabetes insipidus, gastrointestinal diseases and mood disorders.

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Nobel Prize awarded to Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka for their seminal discoveries of the inner working of GPCRs, this Research Topic aims at gathering contributions highlighting the crucial role of neuropeptide GPCRs in neuroendocrinology. We welcome original articles, full reviews, mini-reviews, commentaries and perspectives on the following topics:

 - Expression of neuropeptides and their GPCRs in the central and peripheral nervous systems
 - Ontogeny of neuropeptides and their GPCRs
 - Physiological roles of neuropeptides and their GPCRs
 - Pathologies associated with neuropeptide and GPCR dysfunctions
 - Design of selective, metabolically stable neuropeptide GPCR ligands
 - Phylogenetic history of neuropeptides and their GPCRs
 - Identification of novel neuropeptides in animal models and in humans
 - Deorphanization of orphan neuropeptide GPCRs


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Neuropeptides are the largest and most diverse class of neuromediators in the central and peripheral nervous systems. They play a pivotal role in the control of a vast array of biological functions such as feeding, reproduction, development, growth, learning, nociception, sleep, stress coping, thermoregulation, osmoregulation, and multiple behaviors. Most neuropeptides exert their activities through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are the largest family of cell membrane receptors. Neuropeptide signaling is phylogenetically conserved throughout the animal kingdom from cnidarians to humans. Not surprisingly, neuropeptides and their GPCRs are implicated in a number of pathologies including obesity, infertility, stunting, pain, narcomepsy, diabetes insipidus, gastrointestinal diseases and mood disorders.

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Nobel Prize awarded to Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka for their seminal discoveries of the inner working of GPCRs, this Research Topic aims at gathering contributions highlighting the crucial role of neuropeptide GPCRs in neuroendocrinology. We welcome original articles, full reviews, mini-reviews, commentaries and perspectives on the following topics:

 - Expression of neuropeptides and their GPCRs in the central and peripheral nervous systems
 - Ontogeny of neuropeptides and their GPCRs
 - Physiological roles of neuropeptides and their GPCRs
 - Pathologies associated with neuropeptide and GPCR dysfunctions
 - Design of selective, metabolically stable neuropeptide GPCR ligands
 - Phylogenetic history of neuropeptides and their GPCRs
 - Identification of novel neuropeptides in animal models and in humans
 - Deorphanization of orphan neuropeptide GPCRs


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Abstract
28 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Abstract
28 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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