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Sleep medicine/nosology includes six separate diagnostic groups; 1) insomnia, 2) circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, 3) sleep related movement disorders, 4) parasomnias, 5) central disorders of hypersomnolence, and 6) sleep related breathing disorders. Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder. Chronic ...

Sleep medicine/nosology includes six separate diagnostic groups; 1) insomnia, 2) circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, 3) sleep related movement disorders, 4) parasomnias, 5) central disorders of hypersomnolence, and 6) sleep related breathing disorders. Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder. Chronic insomnia disorder is defined as subjective complaints of problems initiating or maintaining sleep, with negative daytime consequences, for a duration of at least 3 months. The prevalence of both acute and chronic insomnia symptoms in the general population is high, and considered to be on the rise. The prevalence depends on age, sex and socioeconomic status, and several psychological and somatic disorders/diseases appear comorbid with insomnia. The strong association between insomnia and depression has received much interest, and studies suggest that treatment targeting insomnia symptoms will improve treatment outcomes also for the mood disorder. Although insomnia disorder is highly prevalent, it is seldom adequately assessed and treated.

Several recent studies suggest that insomnia is a heterogenic disorder with different phenotypes. For instance, insomnia with objective short sleep duration seems to be a more severe phenotype than other phenotypes. In clinical practice, different phenotypes may also respond differently to treatment. However, more research on this issue is warranted. The role of comorbid conditions on treatment outcomes is also understudied. One goal of this Research Topic is to evaluate and disentangle the bidirectional associations and interactions between insomnia and other psychological and somatic conditions. Furthermore, to separate insomnia disorder from other sleep disorders, is of great importance, as treatment-of-choice varies substantially between the different sleep disorders. The treatment of choice for insomnia disorder is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, but such treatment is seldom available, and most patients still receive insomnia treatment in terms of medications. Easily implementable therapies in clinical practice are clearly needed. Another research goal is to investigate the association of trajectories of insomnia with subsequent health, quality of life and mortality.

In this article collection, we welcome submissions that address the following topics:
• Studies elucidating insomnia as a heterogenic disorder;
• Studies investigating the effects of treatment for insomnia disorder, preferably using randomized controlled trials (including comparison of different therapies);
• Studies disentangling insomnia disorder from other sleep disorders;
• Studies assessing the causal pathways between insomnia and other disorders/diseases and mortality;
• Prevalence studies of insomnia, including identifying correlates and risk factors;
• Systematic reviews and meta-analyses regarding prevalence, treatment, risk factors/correlates and consequences of insomnia.

Additionally, we also welcome studies focusing on:
• Insomnia comorbid with other psychological and/or somatic conditions;
• Insomnia trajectories (including the natural course of the disorder as well as identifitying predictors and consequences);
• How to assess, prevent, and treat insomnia in the general population;
• Daytime impairment and neurocognitive performance deficits in patients with insomnia disorder;
• Insomnia within groups stratified by age, sex, occupation and other socioeconomic factors.

We hope this Research Topic will extend our knowledge base on insomnia disorder, encourage new collaborations, and raise novel challenges.

Keywords: insomnia, comorbidity, heterogeneity, phenotypes, treatment, assessment, trajectories


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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