Research Topic

Decision-making under stress: the importance of cortico-limbic circuits

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

In many domains of society, such as the military, the police force, financial businesses and health care, decisions are made under stressful conditions. Often, only a thin line separates success from failure. In the latter case this may lead to personal dismay and public or political upheaval. Although this ...

In many domains of society, such as the military, the police force, financial businesses and health care, decisions are made under stressful conditions. Often, only a thin line separates success from failure. In the latter case this may lead to personal dismay and public or political upheaval. Although this is clearly recognized in job-related areas using training and assessment programmes directed at addressing e.g. stress-sensitivity of employees, it is only recently that research is disentangling the effects of stress on decision-making in formal research tasks. Brain areas crucial to optimal decision-making encompass interconnected cortico-limbic circuits that are sensitive to and often disrupted by stress through actions of noradrenaline and/or cortisol. More research in this field will reveal the origin and nature of individual differences in stress-related deficits on decision-making. It will also help to develop and further improve existing methods to assess stress-sensitivity and formulate prevention procedures.

Here, we wish to address recent advances in stress-induced changes in decision-making as a consequence of stress-induced changes in cortico-limbic circuits. Topics of interest are: individual differences (genetic, environmental, personality-related), gender-differences, immediate and delayed effects of stress (cortisol), dynamics of noradrenergic and cortisol effects, differences between acute and chronic stress, the power and limitations of animal models including zebrafish, neural underpinning of stress-related effects, goal-directed behaviour and habit formation, and the application of knowledge to societal domains of interest (military, police force et cetera).


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top