Research Topic

Eating Disorders and Weight disorders: Assessment, Early Diagnosis, Prognosis, Treatment Outcome and the Role of Potential Psychological and Social Factors

About this Research Topic

Eating disorders (ED) and weight disorders (WD) are severe illnesses in which young people undergo critical disturbances in their eating behaviors and related thoughts and emotions. In addition, given the scope and severity of obesity and unhealthy diets on health (e.g. diabetes II, cardiovascular disorders), these disorders could have serious repercussions on health, quality of life, and the global economy if prevention mechanisms are not put in place.

Despite the severity and the scope of ED and WD, there are still few studies on the assessment, early diagnosis, prognosis, treatment outcome, and the contribution of psychological resources and psychosocial stressors in the development, maintenance, prevention, and treatment of these disorders.
The situation of the novel coronavirus raises a particular interest in this subject. Although research has explored the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on depression, anxiety, distress, insomnia, and post-traumatic stress (Carvalho et al., 2020; Torales et al., 2020), little is yet known regarding the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on ED and WD. Psychosocial stressors derived from the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders may intensify triggers associated with ED and WD, thus presenting a challenging environment for individuals with or at risk of developing these disorders (Shah et al., 2020). Exploring these effects and adequate pathways to manage ED in the age of COVID-19 would be crucial to help relieve the long-term impacts on health in this population (Shah et al., 2020).

In order to fill this gap in the literature and thus, contribute to reducing the prevalence and the impact of COVID-19-related psychosocial stressors on ED and WD, it would be relevant to study associated biological and clinical aspects, specific psychiatric pathology and comorbidity, as well as the role of potential psychological resources and psychosocial stressors like family psychosocial functioning (e.g. teasing and bullying, the experience of family care, expressed emotion), emotional intelligence, self-esteem, life satisfaction, body dissatisfaction, social support, social isolation, discrimination, exhaustion, depression, anxiety, stress, etc. in the development, maintenance, prevention, treatment and relapse of these disorders. Furthermore, it would be useful to explore the effects of stay-at-home orders on the onset, maintenance, and worsening of ED and WD among individuals with or at risk of developing these disorders.

In addition to the theoretical implications, this research would also contribute to the design of prevention and intervention programs that would complement and enrich other well-established interventions like cognitive-behavioral therapy and would help to reduce the impact of COVID-19-related stressors.

Recent advances show that the ED network structure or interconnectivity of ED symptoms vary significantly from adolescence to adulthood. Therefore, it would be pertinent to study the relationship of the mentioned variables with ED and WD using samples that include individuals at different developmental stages (childhood, adolescence, and adulthood).

Systematic Reviews, Meta-analysis, Original Research (based on empirical studies, instrumental research, or validation studies), Hypothesis and Theory, and Protocols are welcome.


Keywords: Eating disorders, weight disorders, assessment, early diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, psychological and social factors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Eating disorders (ED) and weight disorders (WD) are severe illnesses in which young people undergo critical disturbances in their eating behaviors and related thoughts and emotions. In addition, given the scope and severity of obesity and unhealthy diets on health (e.g. diabetes II, cardiovascular disorders), these disorders could have serious repercussions on health, quality of life, and the global economy if prevention mechanisms are not put in place.

Despite the severity and the scope of ED and WD, there are still few studies on the assessment, early diagnosis, prognosis, treatment outcome, and the contribution of psychological resources and psychosocial stressors in the development, maintenance, prevention, and treatment of these disorders.
The situation of the novel coronavirus raises a particular interest in this subject. Although research has explored the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on depression, anxiety, distress, insomnia, and post-traumatic stress (Carvalho et al., 2020; Torales et al., 2020), little is yet known regarding the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on ED and WD. Psychosocial stressors derived from the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders may intensify triggers associated with ED and WD, thus presenting a challenging environment for individuals with or at risk of developing these disorders (Shah et al., 2020). Exploring these effects and adequate pathways to manage ED in the age of COVID-19 would be crucial to help relieve the long-term impacts on health in this population (Shah et al., 2020).

In order to fill this gap in the literature and thus, contribute to reducing the prevalence and the impact of COVID-19-related psychosocial stressors on ED and WD, it would be relevant to study associated biological and clinical aspects, specific psychiatric pathology and comorbidity, as well as the role of potential psychological resources and psychosocial stressors like family psychosocial functioning (e.g. teasing and bullying, the experience of family care, expressed emotion), emotional intelligence, self-esteem, life satisfaction, body dissatisfaction, social support, social isolation, discrimination, exhaustion, depression, anxiety, stress, etc. in the development, maintenance, prevention, treatment and relapse of these disorders. Furthermore, it would be useful to explore the effects of stay-at-home orders on the onset, maintenance, and worsening of ED and WD among individuals with or at risk of developing these disorders.

In addition to the theoretical implications, this research would also contribute to the design of prevention and intervention programs that would complement and enrich other well-established interventions like cognitive-behavioral therapy and would help to reduce the impact of COVID-19-related stressors.

Recent advances show that the ED network structure or interconnectivity of ED symptoms vary significantly from adolescence to adulthood. Therefore, it would be pertinent to study the relationship of the mentioned variables with ED and WD using samples that include individuals at different developmental stages (childhood, adolescence, and adulthood).

Systematic Reviews, Meta-analysis, Original Research (based on empirical studies, instrumental research, or validation studies), Hypothesis and Theory, and Protocols are welcome.


Keywords: Eating disorders, weight disorders, assessment, early diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, psychological and social factors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 February 2021 Abstract
01 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 February 2021 Abstract
01 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..