Research Topic

Antifungal Resistance: from Molecular to Global Issues

About this Research Topic

Fungi are ubiquitously present in natural environments and colonize human spaces. They include pathogens for humans, animals, insects, and plants, which are incredibly impacting global health, agriculture, and biodiversity. Importantly, superficial fungal infections affect ~25% of the population worldwide, invasive fungal infections with much high mortality rates kill 1.5 million people every year and plant fungal pathogens endanger global food security. One of the most useful and effective options to control the fungal pathogens is antifungals. Currently used antifungals target essential cellular functions such as ergosterol, cell walls, or respiration. Many chemicals are available to protect crops, but the speed of the development of newly licensed fungicides does not keep pace with their demand. The situation is more serious in case of fungal infection for human because the approved antifungal options are very limited.

As a consequence, the emergence of antifungal-resistant fungal pathogens makes it more difficult to fight these pathogens. For plant pathogens, monoculture cropping, and overuse or inadequate use of fungicides accelerate the rapid emergence of the resistant strains. In the clinical setting, the most widely used class of drugs, i.e. the azoles, are less effective due to the emergence and prevalence of the resistant strains. In recent years, multi-drug resistant fungal pathogens appeared and threatened patients in hospitals worldwide. There is growing evidence that some resistant fungal pathogens move from natural environments to human spaces and from country to country along with the global movement of people and trade goods.

This Research Topic is aiming to share the molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance and actual situation of globalization of the resistance. We also aim to stimulate discussion for the upcoming antifungal resistance in human and plant pathogens. To fight fungal pathogens that can cross the borders, interdisciplinary and international discussions are key factors for success.

The scope of this Research Topic is to cover the interaction of medical antifungals and fungicides with the pathogens, the molecular response to the antifungal compounds available, as well as molecular basis for the resistance mechanisms. The local and global epidemiological research for the resistant pathogen are also welcomed.

The core questions of this Research Topic include:
• When, where, what kind of and how does resistance emerge?
• How different are azole resistance mechanisms in plant and human pathogenic fungi?
• Is drug repositioning possible from humans to plant, and vice versa?
• Is there heterogeneity of resistance mutations in the population of multicellular fungi?
• Is there a difference in the tendency to acquire resistance between strains?
• What are the resistance mechanisms for biological control agents?
• Are genome analysis useful for the elucidation of resistance mechanisms?
• Evolutionary landscapes of CYP51 mutations according to azole use in agriculture
• Azole use in agriculture, is it indispensable?
• Big data science to elucidate adaptation to fungicides in natural populations
• Protein structural changes linked to antifungal resistance

Topic Editor, Dr. Sabine Fillinger received financial support from Corteva AgroScience (2018-2021), Anova+(2020-2023), and Bayer SAS (2017-2018). The other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Antifungal-resistance, Molecular Mechanisms, Epidemiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Fungi are ubiquitously present in natural environments and colonize human spaces. They include pathogens for humans, animals, insects, and plants, which are incredibly impacting global health, agriculture, and biodiversity. Importantly, superficial fungal infections affect ~25% of the population worldwide, invasive fungal infections with much high mortality rates kill 1.5 million people every year and plant fungal pathogens endanger global food security. One of the most useful and effective options to control the fungal pathogens is antifungals. Currently used antifungals target essential cellular functions such as ergosterol, cell walls, or respiration. Many chemicals are available to protect crops, but the speed of the development of newly licensed fungicides does not keep pace with their demand. The situation is more serious in case of fungal infection for human because the approved antifungal options are very limited.

As a consequence, the emergence of antifungal-resistant fungal pathogens makes it more difficult to fight these pathogens. For plant pathogens, monoculture cropping, and overuse or inadequate use of fungicides accelerate the rapid emergence of the resistant strains. In the clinical setting, the most widely used class of drugs, i.e. the azoles, are less effective due to the emergence and prevalence of the resistant strains. In recent years, multi-drug resistant fungal pathogens appeared and threatened patients in hospitals worldwide. There is growing evidence that some resistant fungal pathogens move from natural environments to human spaces and from country to country along with the global movement of people and trade goods.

This Research Topic is aiming to share the molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance and actual situation of globalization of the resistance. We also aim to stimulate discussion for the upcoming antifungal resistance in human and plant pathogens. To fight fungal pathogens that can cross the borders, interdisciplinary and international discussions are key factors for success.

The scope of this Research Topic is to cover the interaction of medical antifungals and fungicides with the pathogens, the molecular response to the antifungal compounds available, as well as molecular basis for the resistance mechanisms. The local and global epidemiological research for the resistant pathogen are also welcomed.

The core questions of this Research Topic include:
• When, where, what kind of and how does resistance emerge?
• How different are azole resistance mechanisms in plant and human pathogenic fungi?
• Is drug repositioning possible from humans to plant, and vice versa?
• Is there heterogeneity of resistance mutations in the population of multicellular fungi?
• Is there a difference in the tendency to acquire resistance between strains?
• What are the resistance mechanisms for biological control agents?
• Are genome analysis useful for the elucidation of resistance mechanisms?
• Evolutionary landscapes of CYP51 mutations according to azole use in agriculture
• Azole use in agriculture, is it indispensable?
• Big data science to elucidate adaptation to fungicides in natural populations
• Protein structural changes linked to antifungal resistance

Topic Editor, Dr. Sabine Fillinger received financial support from Corteva AgroScience (2018-2021), Anova+(2020-2023), and Bayer SAS (2017-2018). The other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Antifungal-resistance, Molecular Mechanisms, Epidemiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

26 December 2020 Abstract
25 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

26 December 2020 Abstract
25 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..