Research Topic

Retaining Ecosystem Legacies in Forest Management: Effects on Forest Structures and Functions

About this Research Topic

Forests are complex systems composed of interconnected structures and functions across wide spatial and temporal scales, all nested within variable and shifting climatic patterns. Forests experience continual managed and natural disturbances, and ongoing recovery and succession, expressed in post-disturbance ecological patterns and processes. Ecosystem legacies, or remnants persisting after disturbances, include memory imprints such as residual trees, deadwood, soils, seeds, above and below-ground biota, and biogeochemical cycles. These legacies can be categorized as information (e.g. genotypes), matter (e.g. biomass), and processes (e.g. cycles). Ecosystem legacies, or memory, in turn affect the ability of the forest to recover and re-organize after disturbance, or resist/adapt to climatic stress; in other words, ecological memory plays an important role in forest resilience. Understanding the role of ecosystem legacies, therefore, is important in designing forest management regimes that foster resilience as we experience global change.

This Research Topic aims to cover how forest management practices that retain ecosystem legacies, whether remaining trees, plants, deadwood, seeds, roots, forest floor, soils, fungi, bacteria, or biogeochemical and hydrological pools, affect forest structures and functions, including forest regeneration, resource acquisition, productivity, biodiversity, biogeochemical cycling, and forest dynamics, in the face of climate change. These management practices and impacts include logging, site preparation, planting, and vegetation management. We invite Original Research and Review papers testing ecosystem legacies in forest management practices.

This Research Topic has been developed in collaboration with Camille Emilie Defrenne of Oakridge National Laboratory.


Keywords: legacy, regeneration, biodiversity, carbon stocks, silviculture systems, forest management, disturbance, global change


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Forests are complex systems composed of interconnected structures and functions across wide spatial and temporal scales, all nested within variable and shifting climatic patterns. Forests experience continual managed and natural disturbances, and ongoing recovery and succession, expressed in post-disturbance ecological patterns and processes. Ecosystem legacies, or remnants persisting after disturbances, include memory imprints such as residual trees, deadwood, soils, seeds, above and below-ground biota, and biogeochemical cycles. These legacies can be categorized as information (e.g. genotypes), matter (e.g. biomass), and processes (e.g. cycles). Ecosystem legacies, or memory, in turn affect the ability of the forest to recover and re-organize after disturbance, or resist/adapt to climatic stress; in other words, ecological memory plays an important role in forest resilience. Understanding the role of ecosystem legacies, therefore, is important in designing forest management regimes that foster resilience as we experience global change.

This Research Topic aims to cover how forest management practices that retain ecosystem legacies, whether remaining trees, plants, deadwood, seeds, roots, forest floor, soils, fungi, bacteria, or biogeochemical and hydrological pools, affect forest structures and functions, including forest regeneration, resource acquisition, productivity, biodiversity, biogeochemical cycling, and forest dynamics, in the face of climate change. These management practices and impacts include logging, site preparation, planting, and vegetation management. We invite Original Research and Review papers testing ecosystem legacies in forest management practices.

This Research Topic has been developed in collaboration with Camille Emilie Defrenne of Oakridge National Laboratory.


Keywords: legacy, regeneration, biodiversity, carbon stocks, silviculture systems, forest management, disturbance, global change


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

11 February 2021 Abstract
11 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

11 February 2021 Abstract
11 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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