Research Topic

Responses of Marine Microbes to Multiple Environmental Drivers of Global Change: the Interplay of Abiotic and Biotic Factors

About this Research Topic

Climate change and other anthropogenic pressures have led to the ongoing ocean global change, including ocean acidification, sea surface warming, deoxygenation, and changes in nutrient and light regimes. These changes simultaneously alter multiple chemical and physical seawater properties of marine ecosystems, which propagate to diverse marine microorganisms inhabiting these environments. On the other hand, the changes in marine microbial communities provide feedbacks to the environment via diverse metabolic activities, further modulate the dwelling environments, and ultimately influence the global climate. It is noteworthy that the changes in various environmental drivers in the marine environment tend to occur simultaneously and thus have complex mulplicative effects on marine ecosystems. In order to make more precise projections of the ecological consequences of global ocean change, it is essential to elucidate the biological responses to a complex matrix of environmental changes.

Marine microbial communities, particularly phytoplankton, are the first responders of these complex environmental changes. As the "driving engine" of the ocean, marine phytoplankton have direct impacts on the marine food web, and changes in their abundances and distribution shape the community dynamics of diverse marine heterotrophs and viruses, as well as protistan grazers and larger animals. On the contrary, the carbon and energy flow of the marine food web can be redirected to the primary producers via the microbial loop or the viral shunt by heterotrophs and viruses.

The scope of this Research Topic is to cover the most recent advances in our understanding of the physiological and molecular responses of marine microbes to the cumulative effects of multiple environmental drivers of the concurrent global ocean change, the interactions between marine phytoplankton and diverse heterotrophs and viruses, as well as contributions of marine microbes to the marine biogeochemical cycles under these environmental changes in different marine habitats.

Authors are invited to submit both original research articles and reviews related to this Research Topic. The scientific questions/topics may include but not limited to:
- The physiological responses of marine microbes to the interplay of multiple environmental drivers of ocean global change and the underlying molecular mechanisms;
- The interactions of marine phytoplankton and diverse heterotrophs or viruses, and their contribution to the biogeochemical cycles;
- The microbial responses to environmental changes in marine sediments;
- Prediction of the impacts of multiple environmental drivers on the marine microbial communities and the related marine biogeochemistry under the framework of global change.


Keywords: multiple stressors, Global change, phytoplankton, bacteria, viruses


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Climate change and other anthropogenic pressures have led to the ongoing ocean global change, including ocean acidification, sea surface warming, deoxygenation, and changes in nutrient and light regimes. These changes simultaneously alter multiple chemical and physical seawater properties of marine ecosystems, which propagate to diverse marine microorganisms inhabiting these environments. On the other hand, the changes in marine microbial communities provide feedbacks to the environment via diverse metabolic activities, further modulate the dwelling environments, and ultimately influence the global climate. It is noteworthy that the changes in various environmental drivers in the marine environment tend to occur simultaneously and thus have complex mulplicative effects on marine ecosystems. In order to make more precise projections of the ecological consequences of global ocean change, it is essential to elucidate the biological responses to a complex matrix of environmental changes.

Marine microbial communities, particularly phytoplankton, are the first responders of these complex environmental changes. As the "driving engine" of the ocean, marine phytoplankton have direct impacts on the marine food web, and changes in their abundances and distribution shape the community dynamics of diverse marine heterotrophs and viruses, as well as protistan grazers and larger animals. On the contrary, the carbon and energy flow of the marine food web can be redirected to the primary producers via the microbial loop or the viral shunt by heterotrophs and viruses.

The scope of this Research Topic is to cover the most recent advances in our understanding of the physiological and molecular responses of marine microbes to the cumulative effects of multiple environmental drivers of the concurrent global ocean change, the interactions between marine phytoplankton and diverse heterotrophs and viruses, as well as contributions of marine microbes to the marine biogeochemical cycles under these environmental changes in different marine habitats.

Authors are invited to submit both original research articles and reviews related to this Research Topic. The scientific questions/topics may include but not limited to:
- The physiological responses of marine microbes to the interplay of multiple environmental drivers of ocean global change and the underlying molecular mechanisms;
- The interactions of marine phytoplankton and diverse heterotrophs or viruses, and their contribution to the biogeochemical cycles;
- The microbial responses to environmental changes in marine sediments;
- Prediction of the impacts of multiple environmental drivers on the marine microbial communities and the related marine biogeochemistry under the framework of global change.


Keywords: multiple stressors, Global change, phytoplankton, bacteria, viruses


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..