Research Topic

Shade Avoidance Syndrome in Plants

About this Research Topic

Plants grown in close proximity experience a change in light quality and quantity, and respond by re-allocating energy resources from storage organs to stem-like organs. This adaptive response, called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS), allows the shaded plant to grow and compete effectively against its neighbors. Common phenotypical changes related to SAS are changes in leaf hyponasty, an increase in hypocotyl and internode elongation and extended petioles. Prolonged shade exposure leads to early flowering, less branching, and decreased seed yield.

Significant advances have been made in our understanding of shade signaling pathway over the past few decades. The complex signaling networks regulated by shade light will continue to be unraveled. Modulation of plant shade signal transduction has tremendous potentials in agriculture. SAS can be improved by genetic manipulation to increase the biomass of important bioenergy crops in modern breeding.

The goal of this Research Topic is to present an overview of the fundamental discoveries in the field of plant SAS. We welcome submissions of different types of manuscripts including original research papers, reviews, and methods, including but not limited to:
• Shade light perception and downstream signaling
• Shade-hormone interactions
• Abiotic/biotic stress with SAS
• SAS in different species
• SAS in agricultural applications

Please note descriptive studies which only report a response will not be considered. Physiological insight into the response must also be provided


Keywords: shade avoidance responses, photoreceptor, photomorphogenesis, vegetative growth, crop yields


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Plants grown in close proximity experience a change in light quality and quantity, and respond by re-allocating energy resources from storage organs to stem-like organs. This adaptive response, called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS), allows the shaded plant to grow and compete effectively against its neighbors. Common phenotypical changes related to SAS are changes in leaf hyponasty, an increase in hypocotyl and internode elongation and extended petioles. Prolonged shade exposure leads to early flowering, less branching, and decreased seed yield.

Significant advances have been made in our understanding of shade signaling pathway over the past few decades. The complex signaling networks regulated by shade light will continue to be unraveled. Modulation of plant shade signal transduction has tremendous potentials in agriculture. SAS can be improved by genetic manipulation to increase the biomass of important bioenergy crops in modern breeding.

The goal of this Research Topic is to present an overview of the fundamental discoveries in the field of plant SAS. We welcome submissions of different types of manuscripts including original research papers, reviews, and methods, including but not limited to:
• Shade light perception and downstream signaling
• Shade-hormone interactions
• Abiotic/biotic stress with SAS
• SAS in different species
• SAS in agricultural applications

Please note descriptive studies which only report a response will not be considered. Physiological insight into the response must also be provided


Keywords: shade avoidance responses, photoreceptor, photomorphogenesis, vegetative growth, crop yields


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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