Research Topic

Molecular Characterization of Clinically Important Gram-Negative Bacteria Recovered from the Environment: Antimicrobial Resistance, Virulence and Epidemiology

About this Research Topic

Antimicrobial resistance and its impacts have been a major public health concern that results in increasing the therapy costs and mortality rates in serious infections. The use of antimicrobials and horizontal gene transfer mediated by mobile genetic elements are following the appearance of resistance to antimicrobials in different environments.

Several factors are involved in the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, including the overuse of antimicrobials, which promotes the spread of antimicrobial resistance genes in the most diverse habitats, including aquatic reservoirs, soil and air. Among these bacteria, the Enterobacterales stand out, since they cause infections and are resistant to the different antimicrobial agents used as therapeutic measures. Although the species Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae are the most frequently reported, other genera and species have also been reported carrying antimicrobial resistance genes in the environment.
Since the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, associated with different virulence factors and the clonal relationship between them is a global public health problem, the characterization of clinically important bacteria isolated from the environment is essential for monitoring antimicrobial resistance worldwide, which is associated with the One Health concept.

In addition, by analyzing the genetic diversity and epidemiological relationship of environmental bacteria, it is possible to determine whether the same clones have been reported in different sources and whether they are considered international high-risk clones.

This Research Topic welcomes manuscripts with a particular focus on the synthesis, applications and mechanistic aspects of antimicrobial resistance with genetic and virulence useful but will welcome manuscripts focused on the molecular characterization of clinically important Gram-negative bacteria recovered from different environmental sources, including water, air and soil, in one or more of the following subjects:
• Describe antimicrobial-resistant isolates and to determine the antimicrobial resistance genes associated with the phenotype found.
• Determine the genetic elements related to the acquired antimicrobial resistance determinants.
• Analyze virulence potential and clonal relationship.


Keywords: Molecular characterization, Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug-resistant, resistance, resistance-genes, horizontal gene transfer


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Antimicrobial resistance and its impacts have been a major public health concern that results in increasing the therapy costs and mortality rates in serious infections. The use of antimicrobials and horizontal gene transfer mediated by mobile genetic elements are following the appearance of resistance to antimicrobials in different environments.

Several factors are involved in the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, including the overuse of antimicrobials, which promotes the spread of antimicrobial resistance genes in the most diverse habitats, including aquatic reservoirs, soil and air. Among these bacteria, the Enterobacterales stand out, since they cause infections and are resistant to the different antimicrobial agents used as therapeutic measures. Although the species Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae are the most frequently reported, other genera and species have also been reported carrying antimicrobial resistance genes in the environment.
Since the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, associated with different virulence factors and the clonal relationship between them is a global public health problem, the characterization of clinically important bacteria isolated from the environment is essential for monitoring antimicrobial resistance worldwide, which is associated with the One Health concept.

In addition, by analyzing the genetic diversity and epidemiological relationship of environmental bacteria, it is possible to determine whether the same clones have been reported in different sources and whether they are considered international high-risk clones.

This Research Topic welcomes manuscripts with a particular focus on the synthesis, applications and mechanistic aspects of antimicrobial resistance with genetic and virulence useful but will welcome manuscripts focused on the molecular characterization of clinically important Gram-negative bacteria recovered from different environmental sources, including water, air and soil, in one or more of the following subjects:
• Describe antimicrobial-resistant isolates and to determine the antimicrobial resistance genes associated with the phenotype found.
• Determine the genetic elements related to the acquired antimicrobial resistance determinants.
• Analyze virulence potential and clonal relationship.


Keywords: Molecular characterization, Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug-resistant, resistance, resistance-genes, horizontal gene transfer


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
30 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2021 Abstract
30 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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