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Resistance training (RT) refers to a specialized method of physical conditioning that involves the progressive use of a wide range of resistive loads, including body mass and a variety of modalities such as machine-based training, free weight training, functional training and plyometric training, to enhance ...

Resistance training (RT) refers to a specialized method of physical conditioning that involves the progressive use of a wide range of resistive loads, including body mass and a variety of modalities such as machine-based training, free weight training, functional training and plyometric training, to enhance health, physical fitness and sports-specific performance. There is abundant evidence on the effectiveness of RT programs on components of physical fitness (e.g., muscle strength, muscle power, linear speed, change-of-direction speed) and sports-specific performance (e.g., throwing/kicking velocity) in young and adult athletes. Therefore, RT has become a fundamental part of physical preparation in many sports. Additionally, RT has been recommended as an important training method to be used throughout the stages of long-term athlete development.

It is well-accepted that training-induced gains reduce with increasing training experience. In such cases, more advanced RT programs are necessary to sustain progressive overload and to continue adaptation(s) to training stimuli. Of note, advanced RT may constitute non-conventional RT methods such as superset training, whole-body vibration training, neuromuscular electrical stimulation training, complex training, and blood-flow restriction training. However, the effectiveness of these methods in improving physical fitness and sports-specific performance, as well as their underpinning mechanisms, are yet not fully described in youth and adult athletes.

Thus, the aim of this Frontiers Research Topic is to provide in-depth knowledge in the form of original works, review articles, and meta-analyses on the effects (acute responses and/or chronic adaptations) of advanced RT on components of physical fitness and sports-specific performance, and their underlying mechanisms (e.g., neural and morphological adaptations), in young and adult athletes.

Keywords: Strength training, sportsmen, mechanisms, chronic effects, acute effects


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