Research Topic

Why vaccines to HIV, HCV and Malaria have so far failed - challenges to developing vaccines against immunoregulating pathogens

About this Research Topic

Despite continuous progress in the development of anti-viral and anti-bacterial/parasite drugs, the high cost of medicines and the potential for re-infection, especially in high risk groups, suggest that protective vaccines to some of the most dangerous persistent infections are still highly desirable. There ...

Despite continuous progress in the development of anti-viral and anti-bacterial/parasite drugs, the high cost of medicines and the potential for re-infection, especially in high risk groups, suggest that protective vaccines to some of the most dangerous persistent infections are still highly desirable. There are no vaccines available for HIV, HCV and Malaria, and all attempts to make a broadly effective vaccine have failed so far. In this Research Topic we would like to look into why vaccines have failed over the years, and what we have learnt from each attempt.

The research topic is not limited to only HIV, HCV and Malaria, and we would welcome submissions on other pathogens that are difficult to vaccinate against, such as Helicobacter and some other bacteria. It is expected that a major component of vaccine failure could be the capacity of pathogens like HIV, HCV and Malaria to sabotage the immune system.

We welcome the submission of Original Research articles, as well as highly specific Review articles covering the various attempts by researchers to create effective vaccines for these illnesses. We would also welcome Hypothesis and Theory articles on the experimental evidence and the theoretical basis as to why vaccine trials have been largely disappointing. This research topic hopes to comprehensively detail what we have learnt, what we know will not work, what is still possible and what we can hope for in the future.

Rather than only showing positive results, this issue aims to reflect on failed efforts in vaccine development. Coming to understand our limitations will have theoretical and practical implications for the future development of vaccines to these major global disease burdens.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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