Research Topic

Microbiome and Human Host Interactions and Their Implications on Human Health

About this Research Topic

The human microbiome consists of fungi, archaea, bacteria, and viruses that colonize various areas of the human organ systems such as digestive, respiratory, skin, and urogenital areas. Our microbiome plays a critical role in our health: it defends us against pathogen, contributes to the development of our immune system, and helps metabolize various compounds. Maintaining a balanced microbiota ecosystem is vital to maintaining our health. Several studies have demonstrated that dysbiosis or alterations in the balance of the microbial populations in a microbiome can significantly alter the host’s homeostasis and are linked to a plethora of health problems.

There exists a dynamic interaction between the microbiome and its human hosts influenced by factors related to the microbiome, the hosts, and the environment. Despite a large increase in research on the human microbiome and rapid advancement of high-throughput, culture-independent technologies that has allowed us to investigate the population structure and genetic potential of our microbiome, we are only beginning to understand how these microbial, host, and environmental factors are shaping the dynamics of the interactions between us and our microbiome and how these interactions, in turn, contribute to our health.

In this special issue, we accept various research studies, ranging from molecular, pre-clinical, and clinical studies, that focus on the interactions between the microbiome and its human host on various organs and organ systems and how these interactions influence our health. Below are some examples of accepted research studies, but not limited to the following:

• Single or multiomics analysis on cellular gene expressions of both microbiomes and cell-lines (or animal models)
• Population analysis of microbiomes on people with inflammatory bowel diseases.
• Analysis of secreted metabolites from microbiome and its effect on people with neuropathological diseases.
• Metagenomics analysis of altered microbiomes in people with Diabetes Mellitus type II with elevated FOS intake.
• Response in patients’ body fat and triglyceride level upon alteration of gut microbiota with probiotic supplementation
• Alteration of the microbial population in certain diseases

Types of eligible research studies include original research articles, research communications, reviews, systematic reviews, mini-reviews, expert opinions, and perspectives.

This Research Topic does not consider descriptive studies that are solely based on amplicon (eg. 16S rRNA) profiles, unless they are accompanied by a clear hypothesis and experimentation and provide insight into the microbiological system or process being studied. Authors are encouraged to submit a statement alongside the manuscript where they specify the methods used to test the hypothesis and how the reported results support and validate this hypothesis.


Keywords: Microbiomes, microbial population, host, diseases, health


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The human microbiome consists of fungi, archaea, bacteria, and viruses that colonize various areas of the human organ systems such as digestive, respiratory, skin, and urogenital areas. Our microbiome plays a critical role in our health: it defends us against pathogen, contributes to the development of our immune system, and helps metabolize various compounds. Maintaining a balanced microbiota ecosystem is vital to maintaining our health. Several studies have demonstrated that dysbiosis or alterations in the balance of the microbial populations in a microbiome can significantly alter the host’s homeostasis and are linked to a plethora of health problems.

There exists a dynamic interaction between the microbiome and its human hosts influenced by factors related to the microbiome, the hosts, and the environment. Despite a large increase in research on the human microbiome and rapid advancement of high-throughput, culture-independent technologies that has allowed us to investigate the population structure and genetic potential of our microbiome, we are only beginning to understand how these microbial, host, and environmental factors are shaping the dynamics of the interactions between us and our microbiome and how these interactions, in turn, contribute to our health.

In this special issue, we accept various research studies, ranging from molecular, pre-clinical, and clinical studies, that focus on the interactions between the microbiome and its human host on various organs and organ systems and how these interactions influence our health. Below are some examples of accepted research studies, but not limited to the following:

• Single or multiomics analysis on cellular gene expressions of both microbiomes and cell-lines (or animal models)
• Population analysis of microbiomes on people with inflammatory bowel diseases.
• Analysis of secreted metabolites from microbiome and its effect on people with neuropathological diseases.
• Metagenomics analysis of altered microbiomes in people with Diabetes Mellitus type II with elevated FOS intake.
• Response in patients’ body fat and triglyceride level upon alteration of gut microbiota with probiotic supplementation
• Alteration of the microbial population in certain diseases

Types of eligible research studies include original research articles, research communications, reviews, systematic reviews, mini-reviews, expert opinions, and perspectives.

This Research Topic does not consider descriptive studies that are solely based on amplicon (eg. 16S rRNA) profiles, unless they are accompanied by a clear hypothesis and experimentation and provide insight into the microbiological system or process being studied. Authors are encouraged to submit a statement alongside the manuscript where they specify the methods used to test the hypothesis and how the reported results support and validate this hypothesis.


Keywords: Microbiomes, microbial population, host, diseases, health


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

19 June 2021 Abstract
19 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

19 June 2021 Abstract
19 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..