Research Topic

Genetic Factors affecting the Nutritional and Processing Quality of Milk

About this Research Topic

Genetic factors have a marked influence on production, composition, and physico-chemical properties of milk. Differences are relevant among mammal species and, even within the same species, there are also significant differences at breed, population, and individual levels.
Currently, there is a discernible interest towards non-bovine milk, as in the case of donkey milk whose chemical composition is very similar to human milk and makes it useful for infant nutrition. Within bovine species, genetic selection has led to a dramatic increase in milk yield. In fact, most milk is produced by highly selected cattle breeds that have replaced most autochthonous breeds in the last 70 years, leading to a general reduction of genetic resources. However, these local breeds play a pivotal role in preserving the social, economic, and ecological structure of marginal areas where selected breeds cannot be reared efficiently. When considering single animals, alleles affecting the processing properties of milk have been characterized in bovine, caprine and ovine species.

This Research Topic includes studies focused on the influence of genetic factors (at species, breed, and individual levels) on the nutritional properties of milk and its aptitude to be processed into cheese.


Keywords: genetic, nutritional, milk


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Genetic factors have a marked influence on production, composition, and physico-chemical properties of milk. Differences are relevant among mammal species and, even within the same species, there are also significant differences at breed, population, and individual levels.
Currently, there is a discernible interest towards non-bovine milk, as in the case of donkey milk whose chemical composition is very similar to human milk and makes it useful for infant nutrition. Within bovine species, genetic selection has led to a dramatic increase in milk yield. In fact, most milk is produced by highly selected cattle breeds that have replaced most autochthonous breeds in the last 70 years, leading to a general reduction of genetic resources. However, these local breeds play a pivotal role in preserving the social, economic, and ecological structure of marginal areas where selected breeds cannot be reared efficiently. When considering single animals, alleles affecting the processing properties of milk have been characterized in bovine, caprine and ovine species.

This Research Topic includes studies focused on the influence of genetic factors (at species, breed, and individual levels) on the nutritional properties of milk and its aptitude to be processed into cheese.


Keywords: genetic, nutritional, milk


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

06 August 2021 Abstract
04 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

06 August 2021 Abstract
04 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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