Research Topic

Patient-facing Information Technology Implementation in Healthcare

About this Research Topic

Recent years have seen sensors integrated into wearable, ingestible, or contactless systems revolutionizing healthcare practices — identifying and predicting changes in health, such as illness, intoxication and physical impairment. The study and refinement of these sensors, their architecture, applications and linked interventions represent novel methods for the remote detection and management of a myriad of disease states, and have taken on increased urgency as the COVID-19 pandemic has expedited the adoption of a new paradigm of health care delivery that emphasizes remote care. Thus, while commercial sensor suites have previously been consumer facing and centered around exercise and fitness, traditionally conservative healthcare systems have over the past year taken up the mantle of piloting and adopting an increasing number of remote care platforms.

The journey from conceptual use of a sensor system to its ultimate implementation as a research tool or clinical application is complex and requires a multidisciplinary team of physicians, patients, social scientists and engineers. While body sensor systems have traditionally been packaged into devices based on the needs and form factors envisioned by the designer, the paradigm continues to shift towards user-center design. This Research Topic will explore the pathway from design to deployment and integration of sensor systems and novel IT platforms designed to diagnose or treat human health conditions.

We specifically encourage submissions on:
-Team-based theory and approaches to building sensor systems
-Qualitative work exploring implementation challenges of sensors in clinical practice, consumer healthcare or research applications
-Data-driven information technology platforms for assessment of acute changes in health states (e.g., presence or absence of disease, intoxication, impairment)
-Novel data processing techniques
-Data architecture and patient-physician interfaces related to sensor systems
-Behavioral interventions linked to sensor systems

We would like to acknowledge Dr. Jeffrey Lai, who has acted as coordinator and has contributed to the preparation of the proposal for this Research Topic.


Keywords: information technology, sensors, healthcare, digital diagnostics, digital therapeutics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent years have seen sensors integrated into wearable, ingestible, or contactless systems revolutionizing healthcare practices — identifying and predicting changes in health, such as illness, intoxication and physical impairment. The study and refinement of these sensors, their architecture, applications and linked interventions represent novel methods for the remote detection and management of a myriad of disease states, and have taken on increased urgency as the COVID-19 pandemic has expedited the adoption of a new paradigm of health care delivery that emphasizes remote care. Thus, while commercial sensor suites have previously been consumer facing and centered around exercise and fitness, traditionally conservative healthcare systems have over the past year taken up the mantle of piloting and adopting an increasing number of remote care platforms.

The journey from conceptual use of a sensor system to its ultimate implementation as a research tool or clinical application is complex and requires a multidisciplinary team of physicians, patients, social scientists and engineers. While body sensor systems have traditionally been packaged into devices based on the needs and form factors envisioned by the designer, the paradigm continues to shift towards user-center design. This Research Topic will explore the pathway from design to deployment and integration of sensor systems and novel IT platforms designed to diagnose or treat human health conditions.

We specifically encourage submissions on:
-Team-based theory and approaches to building sensor systems
-Qualitative work exploring implementation challenges of sensors in clinical practice, consumer healthcare or research applications
-Data-driven information technology platforms for assessment of acute changes in health states (e.g., presence or absence of disease, intoxication, impairment)
-Novel data processing techniques
-Data architecture and patient-physician interfaces related to sensor systems
-Behavioral interventions linked to sensor systems

We would like to acknowledge Dr. Jeffrey Lai, who has acted as coordinator and has contributed to the preparation of the proposal for this Research Topic.


Keywords: information technology, sensors, healthcare, digital diagnostics, digital therapeutics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

06 August 2021 Abstract
04 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

06 August 2021 Abstract
04 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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