Research Topic

Binge Drinking in the Adolescent and Young Brain – Volume II

About this Research Topic

This Research Topic is the second volume of Research Topic "Binge Drinking in the Adolescent and Young Brain". Please see the first volume here.

Binge drinking (BD), also known as heavy episodic drinking or college drinking, is a highly prevalent pattern in most Western countries characterized by the intake of large amounts of alcohol in a short time followed by periods of abstinence. This excessive pattern of alcohol use is a regular practice in around a third of European and American youth. The high prevalence of BD at this age is of particular concern since adolescents are in a period of special vulnerability to neurotoxic effects of alcohol, mainly due to the structural and functional changes going on in the brain throughout this key developmental stage.

As showed in the first volume of the Research Topic, evidence gathered during the last decade from animal and human studies seems to point out multiple brain anomalies associated with BD at different levels: biochemical, structural, functional, but also cognitive and affective. In this Second Volume, our aim is to bring together the most recent studies –namely original research and systematic or critical reviews- which provide a comprehensive approach regarding the effects of BD on the adolescent and young brain. Thus, we aim to include manuscripts from different domains (preclinical and clinical research), perspectives (genetic, behavioral, neuropsychological, clinical psychology, psychophysiology, neuroimaging, etc.), and methods (behavioural, biochemical, EEG, MEG, MRI, etc.). Likewise, we welcome submissions aimed at examining the effects of BD beyond the brain (personality dimensions, polygenic risk, peripheral inflammation, cortisol response, gut microbiome, etc.) and approaches focused on reducing BD, such as cognitive training and/or neuromodulation (by tDCS, TMS, etc.).


Keywords: Alcohol, Binge Drinking, Heavy Drinking, Adolescence, Young Adulthood, Brain


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

This Research Topic is the second volume of Research Topic "Binge Drinking in the Adolescent and Young Brain". Please see the first volume here.

Binge drinking (BD), also known as heavy episodic drinking or college drinking, is a highly prevalent pattern in most Western countries characterized by the intake of large amounts of alcohol in a short time followed by periods of abstinence. This excessive pattern of alcohol use is a regular practice in around a third of European and American youth. The high prevalence of BD at this age is of particular concern since adolescents are in a period of special vulnerability to neurotoxic effects of alcohol, mainly due to the structural and functional changes going on in the brain throughout this key developmental stage.

As showed in the first volume of the Research Topic, evidence gathered during the last decade from animal and human studies seems to point out multiple brain anomalies associated with BD at different levels: biochemical, structural, functional, but also cognitive and affective. In this Second Volume, our aim is to bring together the most recent studies –namely original research and systematic or critical reviews- which provide a comprehensive approach regarding the effects of BD on the adolescent and young brain. Thus, we aim to include manuscripts from different domains (preclinical and clinical research), perspectives (genetic, behavioral, neuropsychological, clinical psychology, psychophysiology, neuroimaging, etc.), and methods (behavioural, biochemical, EEG, MEG, MRI, etc.). Likewise, we welcome submissions aimed at examining the effects of BD beyond the brain (personality dimensions, polygenic risk, peripheral inflammation, cortisol response, gut microbiome, etc.) and approaches focused on reducing BD, such as cognitive training and/or neuromodulation (by tDCS, TMS, etc.).


Keywords: Alcohol, Binge Drinking, Heavy Drinking, Adolescence, Young Adulthood, Brain


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 October 2021 Abstract
28 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 October 2021 Abstract
28 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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