Research Topic

GPCRs: structure, signal transduction, and contribution in pathophysiology

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

G protein coupled-receptors (GPCRs) or seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are the most prevailing class of signaling transduction molecules in human organism, being activated by a diversity of ligands such as peptides, large proteins, lipids, small organic molecules, ions, and others. Classically, GPCRs ...

G protein coupled-receptors (GPCRs) or seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are the most prevailing class of signaling transduction molecules in human organism, being activated by a diversity of ligands such as peptides, large proteins, lipids, small organic molecules, ions, and others. Classically, GPCRs transduce signals by means of heterotrimeric G proteins but more recently other mechanisms and signaling pathways have been reported. GPCRs are involved in plethora of pathophysiological processes and many drugs act by modulating GPCRs’ activities. It is estimated that ca. 40% of all drugs in the market act on GPCRs. In the last years key advances concerning to GPCRs’ structure, signaling properties, and evidences of their involvement in many pathophysiological events were achieved; which shall impact the development of next-generation drugs.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top