Research Topic

Advances in Research of the Cardiovascular Disease Continuum: Endocrine Aspects of Disease Pathophysiology, Risk Predictors, Therapeutics, and Management of Diabetes and Hypertension

About this Research Topic

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a leading cause of death globally, despite having advanced medical and lifestyle interventions. The CVD continuum is a sequence of cardiovascular events that stem from gene-environmental interactions, unhealthy lifestyle influences, and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, and hypertension that dysregulate the endocrine system. Indeed, the co-existence of these risk factors such as diabetes and hypertension inducing hormonal changes in endocrine glands has been observed globally, exacerbating the risks for cardiovascular outcomes. However, much remains unelucidated, undermining the global effort in the prevention and reduction of CVD prevalence. In this Research Topic, through the publication of reviews and original papers, we aim to use an endocrine and metabolic interactomics approach to expand the spectrum of CVD-related research. This Research Topic will specifically focused on hypertension, diabetes, and the influence of both modifiable (diet and lifestyle) and non-modifiable risk factors (genetics) that disrupt endocrine signaling in the hope to gain in-depth knowledge that could expedite the fight against cardiovascular disease development.

Further, our topic will cover the following areas:

• The current state of knowledge regarding endocrine risk predictors of metabolic syndrome (diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension), including pulmonary hypertension
• Interrelationship amongst diabetes hypertension and CVD
• Endocrine causes of hypertension
• Role of hormonal perturbations in females and the development of hypertension
• The novel insight into diet-induced oxidative stress plays in metabolic syndrome, including resistant hypertension /pulmonary hypertension
• The key role of hormonal imbalance interlinking diabetes and treatment-resistant hypertension
• Endocrine aspects of metabolic syndrome and pre-eclampsia
• Childhood predictors of metabolic syndrome from an endocrinology perspective
• Biomarkers of endocrine disruption for the better diagnosis, prognosis, and progression of obesity/diabetes/hypertension/ pulmonary hypertension in limited-resource settings


Keywords: Cardiovascular Disease Continuum, Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes, Hypertension


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a leading cause of death globally, despite having advanced medical and lifestyle interventions. The CVD continuum is a sequence of cardiovascular events that stem from gene-environmental interactions, unhealthy lifestyle influences, and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, and hypertension that dysregulate the endocrine system. Indeed, the co-existence of these risk factors such as diabetes and hypertension inducing hormonal changes in endocrine glands has been observed globally, exacerbating the risks for cardiovascular outcomes. However, much remains unelucidated, undermining the global effort in the prevention and reduction of CVD prevalence. In this Research Topic, through the publication of reviews and original papers, we aim to use an endocrine and metabolic interactomics approach to expand the spectrum of CVD-related research. This Research Topic will specifically focused on hypertension, diabetes, and the influence of both modifiable (diet and lifestyle) and non-modifiable risk factors (genetics) that disrupt endocrine signaling in the hope to gain in-depth knowledge that could expedite the fight against cardiovascular disease development.

Further, our topic will cover the following areas:

• The current state of knowledge regarding endocrine risk predictors of metabolic syndrome (diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension), including pulmonary hypertension
• Interrelationship amongst diabetes hypertension and CVD
• Endocrine causes of hypertension
• Role of hormonal perturbations in females and the development of hypertension
• The novel insight into diet-induced oxidative stress plays in metabolic syndrome, including resistant hypertension /pulmonary hypertension
• The key role of hormonal imbalance interlinking diabetes and treatment-resistant hypertension
• Endocrine aspects of metabolic syndrome and pre-eclampsia
• Childhood predictors of metabolic syndrome from an endocrinology perspective
• Biomarkers of endocrine disruption for the better diagnosis, prognosis, and progression of obesity/diabetes/hypertension/ pulmonary hypertension in limited-resource settings


Keywords: Cardiovascular Disease Continuum, Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes, Hypertension


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

27 August 2021 Abstract
25 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

27 August 2021 Abstract
25 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..