Research Topic

The Phyllosphere Microbiome

About this Research Topic

The phyllosphere refers to all aboveground compartments of a plant, including stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. It is the largest biological surface on Earth and an important habitat for microbial colonizers. In recent years, in-depth studies of microbial communities (epiphytes and endophytes) have shown that tens to hundreds and even more different microbial species can be present in the phyllosphere of an individual plant. Not only have particular microorganisms been shown to contribute to plant health, fitness, and productivity, but they also form transgenerational associations with their hosts through natural transmission across plant generations. However, the current understanding of the phyllosphere microbiome is still incomplete and requires mechanistic approaches to address its ecology and harness its potential for agriculture. In the future, it will be essential to gain further insights into plant-microbe associations in this widespread microhabitat, especially to design microbiome-based applications for sustainable plant production.

Here, we want to collect a broad spectrum of contributions that address the phyllosphere microbiome from different perspectives. The overall aims are to i) expand our knowledge related to microbial diversity in the phyllosphere, ii) deepen mechanistic insights into the function of phyllosphere microbiota, and iii) identify potential applications for such microorganisms in agriculture and beyond.

Submissions can include original research as well as review papers. The following aspects will be addressed in the contributions to the Research Topic:

• Occurrence and diversity of phyllosphere-associated microbes in different plant species.
• Assembly and vertical transmission routes of the phyllosphere microbiome.
• Characterization of host and external factors that impact microbes in the phyllosphere during vegetative and reproductive stages of plant development.
• Assessment of molecular plant-microbe interactions during the acquisition and maintenance of microorganisms in the phyllosphere.
• Responses of phyllosphere-endophytic and -epiphytic microbes to abiotic/biotic stress and their functional traits.


Keywords: Assembly, Diversity, Ecological implication, Phyllosphere Microbiome, Interaction


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The phyllosphere refers to all aboveground compartments of a plant, including stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. It is the largest biological surface on Earth and an important habitat for microbial colonizers. In recent years, in-depth studies of microbial communities (epiphytes and endophytes) have shown that tens to hundreds and even more different microbial species can be present in the phyllosphere of an individual plant. Not only have particular microorganisms been shown to contribute to plant health, fitness, and productivity, but they also form transgenerational associations with their hosts through natural transmission across plant generations. However, the current understanding of the phyllosphere microbiome is still incomplete and requires mechanistic approaches to address its ecology and harness its potential for agriculture. In the future, it will be essential to gain further insights into plant-microbe associations in this widespread microhabitat, especially to design microbiome-based applications for sustainable plant production.

Here, we want to collect a broad spectrum of contributions that address the phyllosphere microbiome from different perspectives. The overall aims are to i) expand our knowledge related to microbial diversity in the phyllosphere, ii) deepen mechanistic insights into the function of phyllosphere microbiota, and iii) identify potential applications for such microorganisms in agriculture and beyond.

Submissions can include original research as well as review papers. The following aspects will be addressed in the contributions to the Research Topic:

• Occurrence and diversity of phyllosphere-associated microbes in different plant species.
• Assembly and vertical transmission routes of the phyllosphere microbiome.
• Characterization of host and external factors that impact microbes in the phyllosphere during vegetative and reproductive stages of plant development.
• Assessment of molecular plant-microbe interactions during the acquisition and maintenance of microorganisms in the phyllosphere.
• Responses of phyllosphere-endophytic and -epiphytic microbes to abiotic/biotic stress and their functional traits.


Keywords: Assembly, Diversity, Ecological implication, Phyllosphere Microbiome, Interaction


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2021 Abstract
31 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2021 Abstract
31 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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