Research Topic

High Myopia and Glaucoma

About this Research Topic

Recent decades witnessed a dramatically increased prevalence of myopia, with its prevalence as high as 90% in the East Asian population. High myopia is generally defined as refractive equivalent less than -6 or -8 diopters. It is estimated that 10% of the world population will be highly myopic by 2050. Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness, with an estimate of 111.8 million people suffering from glaucoma worldwide in 2040.

Accumulating evidence from studies in various ethnic groups has identified high myopia as a significant risk factor for glaucoma. The axial-elongation in high myopia may be accompanied by a remodeling of the connective tissue and neural tissues in the optic nerve head and may increase the glaucoma-related insult of the retinal ganglion axons. The increased prevalence of high myopia and glaucoma and their concurrence have significantly increased the risk of visual impairment and the health care burden. It is critical to deepening our understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms of high myopia and glaucoma, thus enable effective prevention and therapy in populations with high myopia and glaucoma.

This Research Topic aims to provide a platform for Original Research articles focusing on the increased glaucoma susceptibility in the highly myopic population.

We welcome submissions focusing on, but not limited to, the following aspects:
1. Epidemiological features and risk factors of glaucoma in the highly myopic population;
2. Recent advances involving the pathogenesis of an increased glaucoma susceptibility in high myopia, including structural and functional changes, alterations of biomechanics, and histological and molecular mechanisms.
3. Etiology of a non-glaucomatous optic neuropathy in high myopia and its clinical evaluation.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent decades witnessed a dramatically increased prevalence of myopia, with its prevalence as high as 90% in the East Asian population. High myopia is generally defined as refractive equivalent less than -6 or -8 diopters. It is estimated that 10% of the world population will be highly myopic by 2050. Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness, with an estimate of 111.8 million people suffering from glaucoma worldwide in 2040.

Accumulating evidence from studies in various ethnic groups has identified high myopia as a significant risk factor for glaucoma. The axial-elongation in high myopia may be accompanied by a remodeling of the connective tissue and neural tissues in the optic nerve head and may increase the glaucoma-related insult of the retinal ganglion axons. The increased prevalence of high myopia and glaucoma and their concurrence have significantly increased the risk of visual impairment and the health care burden. It is critical to deepening our understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms of high myopia and glaucoma, thus enable effective prevention and therapy in populations with high myopia and glaucoma.

This Research Topic aims to provide a platform for Original Research articles focusing on the increased glaucoma susceptibility in the highly myopic population.

We welcome submissions focusing on, but not limited to, the following aspects:
1. Epidemiological features and risk factors of glaucoma in the highly myopic population;
2. Recent advances involving the pathogenesis of an increased glaucoma susceptibility in high myopia, including structural and functional changes, alterations of biomechanics, and histological and molecular mechanisms.
3. Etiology of a non-glaucomatous optic neuropathy in high myopia and its clinical evaluation.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

10 September 2021 Abstract
08 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

10 September 2021 Abstract
08 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..