Research Topic

Myopia: Public Health challenges and interventions

About this Research Topic

Myopia results from an excessive axial length of the eye that develops in childhood. Myopia progression at a rate of -0.50 D per year increases the risk of developing high myopia with associated blinding conditions. Myopia is an important public health problem that affected 30% of the world population in 2020. Before the COVID 19 pandemic the prevalence was expected to rise to 50% by 2050. The introduction of virtual learning tools during the home confinement imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic led to increases in screen time and significant decreases in outdoor time. Recent data from several studies around the world suggest an increased myopia incidence and myopia progression among children after home confinement. Efforts to reduce the prevalence, progression, and severity of myopia could have a profound impact on public health.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel research trends in myopia, especially preventive strategies to avoid younger age of myopia onset or accelerated progression to high myopia. Additionally, new studies are important to identify biomarkers that would help to elucidate the pathophysiology of myopia and pathologic myopia that may be used as therapeutic targets in the treatment and prevention of myopia. We aim for a state-of-the-art collection of articles that will provide professionals and managers with knowledge of the risk factors, management, and prevention of myopia.

The Research Topic aims to collect evidence including epidemiological, intervention and policy manuscripts. We invite authors to submit original research articles, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and mini reviews.
Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:
• Epidemiological studies of risk factors and incidence and prevalence of myopia
• Mechanisms of different risk factors to determine myopia progression
• Evaluation of the effectiveness of myopia screening tools or programs
• Interventions and their impact on myopia incidence or progression
• Economic implications of policies and innovations in public health to tackle myopia


Keywords: Myopia, Public Health, confinement, COVID-19, lockdown, screen time


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Myopia results from an excessive axial length of the eye that develops in childhood. Myopia progression at a rate of -0.50 D per year increases the risk of developing high myopia with associated blinding conditions. Myopia is an important public health problem that affected 30% of the world population in 2020. Before the COVID 19 pandemic the prevalence was expected to rise to 50% by 2050. The introduction of virtual learning tools during the home confinement imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic led to increases in screen time and significant decreases in outdoor time. Recent data from several studies around the world suggest an increased myopia incidence and myopia progression among children after home confinement. Efforts to reduce the prevalence, progression, and severity of myopia could have a profound impact on public health.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel research trends in myopia, especially preventive strategies to avoid younger age of myopia onset or accelerated progression to high myopia. Additionally, new studies are important to identify biomarkers that would help to elucidate the pathophysiology of myopia and pathologic myopia that may be used as therapeutic targets in the treatment and prevention of myopia. We aim for a state-of-the-art collection of articles that will provide professionals and managers with knowledge of the risk factors, management, and prevention of myopia.

The Research Topic aims to collect evidence including epidemiological, intervention and policy manuscripts. We invite authors to submit original research articles, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and mini reviews.
Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:
• Epidemiological studies of risk factors and incidence and prevalence of myopia
• Mechanisms of different risk factors to determine myopia progression
• Evaluation of the effectiveness of myopia screening tools or programs
• Interventions and their impact on myopia incidence or progression
• Economic implications of policies and innovations in public health to tackle myopia


Keywords: Myopia, Public Health, confinement, COVID-19, lockdown, screen time


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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