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Staphylococci (staph) are Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic bacteria, belonging to Firmicutes phylum, including at least 40 species. Staphylococci appear spherical (cocci), and they form grape-like clusters. These bacteria are commonly found as commensal bacteria in human microflora of the skin, and mucous ...

Staphylococci (staph) are Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic bacteria, belonging to Firmicutes phylum, including at least 40 species. Staphylococci appear spherical (cocci), and they form grape-like clusters. These bacteria are commonly found as commensal bacteria in human microflora of the skin, and mucous membranes of healthy individuals. Colonization with Staphylococci can later lead to minor localized skin infections or can invade the body and lead to more severe illnesses, such as bacteraemia, sepsis infectious arthritis, pneumonia, endocarditis, urinary tract infections and toxic shock syndrome. Treatment of staphylococcal infections usually involves the use of antibiotics and drainage of the infected area. The extensive use of antibiotics in hospital settings has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in short time durations, thus, certain staph infections (e.g. MRSA/MRSE/VRSA) no longer respond to commonly used antibiotics.

Worldwide a growing number of otherwise healthy people are developing life-threatening “staph” infections. In 2018, WHO’s new Global Antimicrobial Surveillance System (GLASS) revealed widespread occurrence of antibiotic resistance among 500 000 people with suspected bacterial infections across 22 countries and one of the most common bacteria found to be responsible was Staphylococcus aureus.

The purpose of this Research Topic is to discuss recent advances in understanding antibiotic resistance mechanisms and new trends of antibiotic resistance epidemiology in Staphylococcus ssp.

Keywords: Antibiotic Resistance, Staphylococcus ssp., Epidemiology


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