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About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 21 February 2023

Model organisms and a wide set of experimental models have long been widely used in the field of biosciences, including a range of subject areas within physiology. Several important milestones have been achieved in the field thanks to their application, allowing scientists to develop concepts, technologies, ...

Model organisms and a wide set of experimental models have long been widely used in the field of biosciences, including a range of subject areas within physiology. Several important milestones have been achieved in the field thanks to their application, allowing scientists to develop concepts, technologies, and methodologies to better understand more complex living systems, including humans.

In addition to focusing on the many advantages of using model organisms and several experimental models
in the field of Clinical and Translational Physiology, this Research Topic also aims to shed light on the challenges and limitations that accompany their use in physiological studies. This collection covers, but is not limited to, the following model organisms and experimental models:

• Animal models of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy
• CRISPR Modeling of inherited cardiomyopathy
• Zebrafish models to study cardiovascular diseases
• Cell-based studies to study cardiac diseases: the potential of primary cells derived from humans (including iPSCs)
• Use of spheroid and organoid cell culture models
• Application of ‘omic technologies
• Heart-on-chip models
• Electrophysiology: experimental models to study the role of cardiac ion channels in disease
• Artificial intelligence models of viscoelastic tissues
• Biomechanical models in soft tissue research
• Imaging and monitoring of neurotransmitters and exerkines
• Models used in biological rhythm research with connection to cardiovascular research
• Telemetry

Manuscripts submitted to this Research Topic should be in line with the scope of the Clinical and Translational Physiology section. Several article types will be considered, please find more information here.

This Research Topic is part of the Experimental Models and Model Organisms series of Frontiers in Physiology. Other titles in this series include:
Model Organisms and Experimental Models in Membrane Physiology and Membrane Biophysics: Opportunities and Challenges
In Vitro Models: Opportunities and Challenges in Aquatic Physiology
Animal Models and Transgenic Technology in Craniofacial Biology
Advances in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based in Vitro Models of the Human Heart for Cardiac Physiology, Disease Modeling and Clinical Applications
Experimental Models and Model Organisms in Cardiac Electrophysiology: Opportunities and Challenges
Model Organisms and Experimental Models: Opportunities and Challenges in Vascular Physiology Research
Invertebrates as Model Organisms: Opportunities and Challenges in Physiology and Bioscience Research
Invertebrates as Model Organisms: Opportunities and Challenges in Physiology and Bioscience Research

Keywords: Clinical and Translational Physiology, Model Organisms, Experimental Organisms, Bioscience, Physiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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