About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 04 November 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 04 February 2023

Vascular diseases account for a significant number of deaths worldwide, with cardiovascular disease remaining the leading cause of mortality. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a well-established risk factor for vascular disease development, with cardiovascular disease being the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. DM is associated with both macrovascular and microvascular disease, with diabetic patients experiencing greater risk of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral artery disease. Vascular complications of diabetes result from a number of mechanisms including; formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), oxidative stress, and inflammation. Further emerging evidence also suggests a role for microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators in the pathogenesis of diabetic vasculopathy. This ongoing, ever-increasing burden of vascular disease and DM has highlighted the need for an effective treatment strategy as a global priority.

Recent advances in regenerative medicine have provided stem cells as powerful tools to study the different cell types that comprise the vascular system, allowing for a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind vascular health and the identification of potential therapeutic targets. Additionally, previous research has also shown a fundamental role for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms in orchestrating responses to vascular damage. Moreover, the elucidation of the critical roles that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and non-coding RNAs have in gene expression and cellular functions has provided a deeper insight into the onset and progression of vascular dysfunction.

In this Research Topic we aim to discuss newly discovered roles of RBPs and non-coding RNAs within the vasculature as well as examine their therapeutic potential, and great potential to restore vascular health in patients with DM. We will also place a particular emphasis on the therapeutic potential of stems in the treatment of diabetes induced vascular disease.

Keywords: stem cells, diabetes, RNA binding protein, vascular disease, non-coding RNA


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Vascular diseases account for a significant number of deaths worldwide, with cardiovascular disease remaining the leading cause of mortality. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a well-established risk factor for vascular disease development, with cardiovascular disease being the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. DM is associated with both macrovascular and microvascular disease, with diabetic patients experiencing greater risk of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral artery disease. Vascular complications of diabetes result from a number of mechanisms including; formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), oxidative stress, and inflammation. Further emerging evidence also suggests a role for microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators in the pathogenesis of diabetic vasculopathy. This ongoing, ever-increasing burden of vascular disease and DM has highlighted the need for an effective treatment strategy as a global priority.

Recent advances in regenerative medicine have provided stem cells as powerful tools to study the different cell types that comprise the vascular system, allowing for a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind vascular health and the identification of potential therapeutic targets. Additionally, previous research has also shown a fundamental role for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms in orchestrating responses to vascular damage. Moreover, the elucidation of the critical roles that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and non-coding RNAs have in gene expression and cellular functions has provided a deeper insight into the onset and progression of vascular dysfunction.

In this Research Topic we aim to discuss newly discovered roles of RBPs and non-coding RNAs within the vasculature as well as examine their therapeutic potential, and great potential to restore vascular health in patients with DM. We will also place a particular emphasis on the therapeutic potential of stems in the treatment of diabetes induced vascular disease.

Keywords: stem cells, diabetes, RNA binding protein, vascular disease, non-coding RNA


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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