Research Topic

Development of a Humanized Mouse Model for Infectious Diseases and Cancer

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

While the traditional animal models contributed immensely to biomedical research there remain many knowledge gaps in translating the results from these to humans. In this context, humanized mice transplanted with functional human cells in a physiological setting offer many advantages in deriving pre-clinical ...

While the traditional animal models contributed immensely to biomedical research there remain many knowledge gaps in translating the results from these to humans. In this context, humanized mice transplanted with functional human cells in a physiological setting offer many advantages in deriving pre-clinical data more akin to that seen in the natural human host. There have been many recent advances in the field that encompass derivation of new transgenic breeds of immunodeficient mice harboring human cytokines and HLA alleles that permit improved human cell engraftment and differentiation.

The ability to generate humanized mice with a functional immune system together with human tissue transplantation such as a functional liver has now paved the way for new experimentation not previously feasible and is beginning to shed light on the complex picture of human pathophysiology and immunopathogenesis. Specifically, human specific pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis viruses and malaria parasites are being studied in these systems and important data on pathogen life cycles in human cells in vivo, viral latency and human specific immune responses are being gathered. In the hematology front, new data are emerging on graft versus host disease using these models. Patient derived xenograft models endowed with transplanted human immune cells are permitting evaluations of various immunotherapies and identification of specific drugs for cancer therapy. Pathogenesis and immune responses for deadly pathogens, such as Ebola and newly emerged viruses like Zika are also being studied, adding a new twist and generating new knowledge in the context of human target cells in an in vivo setting.

The current Research Topic “Development of a humanized mouse model for infectious diseases and cancer,” is calling for submission of original research papers and review articles that deal with the development and refinement of humanized mouse models that mimic the human immune system, which can be applied to not only study human immune responses against infectious disease pathogens and cancer, but also assess the effects of various immunotherapeutic agents and novel vaccines. It is our hope that your contribution to this Research Topic will boost the advancement of the field of humanized mouse models and ultimately lead to the discovery of new human immune phenomena operating in disease manifestation or protection, a novel vaccine and/or immunotherapy against human infectious disease pathogens and cancer.


Keywords: Humanized mice, human immune system, infections, cancer, vaccines, immunotherapies


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top