Research Topic

Multimodal and Longitudinal Bioimaging Methods for Characterizing the Progressive Course of Dementia

About this Research Topic

Dementia is a syndrome that causes a deterioration in memory, thinking, behaviour and the ability to perform everyday activities. According to the World Health Organization it affects 47.5 million people, with 7.7 million new cases every year. The total number of people with dementia is projected to be 75.6 ...

Dementia is a syndrome that causes a deterioration in memory, thinking, behaviour and the ability to perform everyday activities. According to the World Health Organization it affects 47.5 million people, with 7.7 million new cases every year. The total number of people with dementia is projected to be 75.6 million in 2030 and almost triple that number by 2050, with 135.5 million affected people. Dementia is not a normal part of aging, representing one of the major causes of disability and dependency among older people worldwide.

There are many different forms of dementia. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) contributes to 60-70% of the cases. Other major forms include vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, etc.

Although new treatments are being investigated in clinical trials, no treatment to cure dementia or to alter its progressive course exists. Today, we understand that dementia appears only after a decade or more of brain degeneration (preclinical dementia) and current consensus has established the need for early recognition.

An intensive research effort is being devoted to the development of novel neuroimaging biomarkers that can provide an alert even before the cognitive decline appears. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional nuclear medicine neuroimaging techniques including single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are widely used in combination with other blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and genetic biomarkers for early diagnosis of dementia.

Large multicenter studies are currently investigating the value of existing and novel multimodal and longitudinal neurodegeneration biomarkers. The vast amount of data available represents an opportunity for the development of more accurate statistical models of neurodegeneration enabling the early recognition as well as the characterization of the progressive course of dementia.

The aim of this Research Topic in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience is to present the current state of the art in the theory and practice of multimodal and longitudinal neuroimaging approaches for characterizing the progressive course of dementia. Potential fields of research covered in this Topic include, but are not limited to, novel pattern recognition techniques enabling to elucidate normal and abnormal brain function:

- Learning from neuroimaging data
- Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging data
- Network and connectivity models (the connectome)
- Dynamic and time-varying models
- Longitudinal data analysis techniques
- Statistical models of neurodegeneration
- Early diagnosis and prognosis
- Single modal and multimodal structural and functional data analysis methods
- Advanced data classification methods
- Algorithms for large-scale data analysis


Keywords: Dementia, Bioimaging, Multimodal analysis, Large-scale data analysis, Early diagnosis and prognosis, Statistical models of neurodegeneration, Advanced data analysis, Network and connectivity models


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2017 Manuscript
15 December 2017 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2017 Manuscript
15 December 2017 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top