Research Topic

Epidemiology and Control of Notifiable Animal Diseases

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About this Research Topic

Notifiable animal diseases, defined as those required by law to be reported to official authorities, represent an especially important challenge for animal health authorities due to their importance and the resources invested for surveillance, prevention and, when present, control and/or eradication programs. ...

Notifiable animal diseases, defined as those required by law to be reported to official authorities, represent an especially important challenge for animal health authorities due to their importance and the resources invested for surveillance, prevention and, when present, control and/or eradication programs. Effective prevention and control programs must take into account the characteristics of the host (including potential reservoirs), the pathogen (e.g. transmissibility, virulence, variability), the environment (e.g. management factors, weather) and also the socio-economic context in which they have to be implemented (highly influenced by funding availability), while, at the same time, showing compliance with international trade regulations. The need for informing those programs has led to the adoption of a wide range of approaches to address the risk posed by specific pathogens in different countries, and at the same time similar strategies have yielded very different results in different regions.

For this Research Topic, manuscripts focusing on the design, description, evaluation and/or monitoring of surveillance, control and eradication programs targeting notifiable diseases in food, companion and wild terrestrial and aquatic animals from a specific area, country or region are welcome. This Topic will serve as an update on the availability and current knowledge of potential approaches for control and prevention of notifiable diseases such as tuberculosis, brucellosis, foot-and-mouth, bluetongue, classical and African swine fever, bovine leukosis, bovine viral diarrhea, West Nile virus or avian influenza under different epidemiological field conditions. Other reportable diseases in a given region may also be of interest for this Research Topic. Contributions from official veterinary services, or using data collected by veterinary services, aimed at demonstrating the use of epidemiological tools in the implementation or evaluation of prevention and control programs are encouraged. For example, objectives of the manuscripts may include, but are not limited, to:

• Design of surveillance programs to declare freedom from disease at the local, regional or national level.
• Assessment of reliability of official diagnostic tests under field conditions.
• Comparative evaluation of control strategies in endemic areas (i.e. vaccination versus stamping out).
• Cost-benefit analyses.
• Influence of situational socio-economic factors on the success of control and eradication programs.
• Experimental studies assessing the suitability of new diagnostic or prophylactic (vaccine) tools as long as there is a clear application for disease surveillance/control under field conditions.


Keywords: Control, Eradication, Surveillance, Notifiable Disease, Vaccination, Diagnosis, Monitoring


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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