Research Topic

Risk Behaviour and Health Outcomes of Adolescents and Young Adults

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Health risk behaviours such as substance use, (risky) sexual behaviour, unhealthy eating behaviour, risky driving, aggression, risky (social) media use, and minor delinquency are are very common in adolescence and young adulthood. While to some degree, these behaviors are part of normal development and experimentation, the extent to which young people engage in these behaviours and are at increased risk of adverse health and social outcomes differs substantially between individuals and social groups.

Risky or unhealthy habits and behavioral patterns typically develop in late adolescence, and to a large degree, shape the extent to which a person may encounter difficulties or problems later in life with respect to their health and social outcomes.

Successful transitioning into adult roles (in terms of work, romantic relations, education) is closely related to the extent to which adolescents and young adults are able to manage their desires and behaviours, which are often impulsive and influenced by aspects of the physical and social environment. This requires healthy self-regulation skills that are acquired more easily by some individuals and social groups, and enacted more directly in certain (social) situations.

This Research Topic is concerned with questions regarding the risk behaviours, resilience and health outcomes of adolescents and young adults, including their prevalence, development, antecedents, and potential interventions. This Research Topic aims to provide an interdisciplinary perspective and bring together scholarly perspectives from different fields of research concerned with risk behavior and health outcomes of adolescents and young adults. The Research Topic is open, but not limited to contributions examining questions such as:

1) How does risk behaviour develop during adolescence and young adulthood, and how does this track into later stages of life?
2) To what extent are adverse health and social outcomes in adulthood associated with specific or typical involvement in risk behaviours in adolescence and young adulthood?
3) What factors with regard to risk behaviour contribute to adverse development and increase the risk of mental health problems?
4) What factors with regard to risk behaviour contribute to positive health and successful development, including intervention and prevention strategies?


Keywords: Risk behavior, adolescence, young adults, health behavior, adolescent development


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Health risk behaviours such as substance use, (risky) sexual behaviour, unhealthy eating behaviour, risky driving, aggression, risky (social) media use, and minor delinquency are are very common in adolescence and young adulthood. While to some degree, these behaviors are part of normal development and experimentation, the extent to which young people engage in these behaviours and are at increased risk of adverse health and social outcomes differs substantially between individuals and social groups.

Risky or unhealthy habits and behavioral patterns typically develop in late adolescence, and to a large degree, shape the extent to which a person may encounter difficulties or problems later in life with respect to their health and social outcomes.

Successful transitioning into adult roles (in terms of work, romantic relations, education) is closely related to the extent to which adolescents and young adults are able to manage their desires and behaviours, which are often impulsive and influenced by aspects of the physical and social environment. This requires healthy self-regulation skills that are acquired more easily by some individuals and social groups, and enacted more directly in certain (social) situations.

This Research Topic is concerned with questions regarding the risk behaviours, resilience and health outcomes of adolescents and young adults, including their prevalence, development, antecedents, and potential interventions. This Research Topic aims to provide an interdisciplinary perspective and bring together scholarly perspectives from different fields of research concerned with risk behavior and health outcomes of adolescents and young adults. The Research Topic is open, but not limited to contributions examining questions such as:

1) How does risk behaviour develop during adolescence and young adulthood, and how does this track into later stages of life?
2) To what extent are adverse health and social outcomes in adulthood associated with specific or typical involvement in risk behaviours in adolescence and young adulthood?
3) What factors with regard to risk behaviour contribute to adverse development and increase the risk of mental health problems?
4) What factors with regard to risk behaviour contribute to positive health and successful development, including intervention and prevention strategies?


Keywords: Risk behavior, adolescence, young adults, health behavior, adolescent development


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top