Research Topic

Peripheral Regulators of Obesity

About this Research Topic

The incidence of obesity is increasing significantly worldwide, and is considered to be one of the most serious public health challenges. This is because obesity and associated pathologies (including, but not limited to, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), kidney disease and cardiovascular disease), increase morbidity and mortality and reduce the quality of life irrespective of age, sex or ethnicity. Obesity arises as a consequence of the imbalance between nutritional intake, energy expenditure and energy storage. Despite the impact (both social and economic) of obesity little is known of the complex physiology that dictates the maintenance of the obese state and resistance to weight loss, and the link between obesity and complex diseases, including T2DM, particularly in the periphery. Understanding the peripheral abnormalities that are present in obesity are essential to our development of treatments for these conditions.

We are interested in articles that investigate the role of the periphery in aspects of obesity and its associated co-morbidities, as well as therapeutics which specifically target the periphery. We welcome authors to submit original research articles as well as review articles that will stimulate a greater understanding of the peripheral regulation and abnormalities present in obesity. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

• Peripheral mechanisms controlling obesity
• Peripheral mechanisms controlling obesity associated pathologies
• Novel pharmacotherapy approaches to treatment and/or prevention of obesity
• Novel approaches to non-pharmacotherapy interventions (including exercise and dietary approaches as well as others) in the treatment and/or prevention of obesity
• Novel approaches to prevent and/or treat obesity related pathologies
• Circulating factors or receptors that can be altered by diet that regulate energy storage and/or peripheral energy expenditure
• Molecular mechanisms by which organ function in the periphery is altered by obesity
• Signaling cascades that are altered by diet or exercise that can improve obesity associated comorbidities
• Molecular understanding of how exercise, dietary factors or changes in dietary patterns at any stage of the life span may decrease obesity risk


Keywords: Obesity, pharmacotherapy, nutrition, exercise, peripheral regulators


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The incidence of obesity is increasing significantly worldwide, and is considered to be one of the most serious public health challenges. This is because obesity and associated pathologies (including, but not limited to, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), kidney disease and cardiovascular disease), increase morbidity and mortality and reduce the quality of life irrespective of age, sex or ethnicity. Obesity arises as a consequence of the imbalance between nutritional intake, energy expenditure and energy storage. Despite the impact (both social and economic) of obesity little is known of the complex physiology that dictates the maintenance of the obese state and resistance to weight loss, and the link between obesity and complex diseases, including T2DM, particularly in the periphery. Understanding the peripheral abnormalities that are present in obesity are essential to our development of treatments for these conditions.

We are interested in articles that investigate the role of the periphery in aspects of obesity and its associated co-morbidities, as well as therapeutics which specifically target the periphery. We welcome authors to submit original research articles as well as review articles that will stimulate a greater understanding of the peripheral regulation and abnormalities present in obesity. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

• Peripheral mechanisms controlling obesity
• Peripheral mechanisms controlling obesity associated pathologies
• Novel pharmacotherapy approaches to treatment and/or prevention of obesity
• Novel approaches to non-pharmacotherapy interventions (including exercise and dietary approaches as well as others) in the treatment and/or prevention of obesity
• Novel approaches to prevent and/or treat obesity related pathologies
• Circulating factors or receptors that can be altered by diet that regulate energy storage and/or peripheral energy expenditure
• Molecular mechanisms by which organ function in the periphery is altered by obesity
• Signaling cascades that are altered by diet or exercise that can improve obesity associated comorbidities
• Molecular understanding of how exercise, dietary factors or changes in dietary patterns at any stage of the life span may decrease obesity risk


Keywords: Obesity, pharmacotherapy, nutrition, exercise, peripheral regulators


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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