Research Topic

Polyploid Population Genetics and Evolution - From Theory to Practice

About this Research Topic

This topic has been realized, and is in collaboration with Abdulquder Jighly, pre-doctoral student (La Trobe University, Australia) as part of Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution's Mentorship Program

Polyploidisation, whole genome duplication, is a major evolutionary force that shapes the diversity of angiosperms, ferns, fish, reptiles, arthropods and amphibians lineages. Polyploids have two major classifications, allopolyploids (a hybrid of two or more distinguished genomes) and autopolyploids (resulted from multiple duplication of a single genome). Although polyploidisation is very common in nature, its effect at the population level has been poorly studied due to complexities related to the inheritance and evolution of polyploids.

In practice, the similarity among allopolyploid ancestral diploid genomes and the presence of more than two copies of each chromosome in autopolyploids make it, in most cases, impossible to infer polyploid population genetics characteristics using diploid statistical methods creating a need to develop new models especially for polyploids. Polyploidisation complexities can even influence genomic and functional genomic analyses such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, next generation sequencing (NGS) and genome editing.

This Research Topic provides a platform for scientists to share their opinions and shape the future of polyploid population genetic studies and applications. The broad aim is to throw a light on the theoretical evolutionary and population genetics of polyploids and how to exploit such information for different applications. We welcome submissions of any type in areas related but not limited to:
1- Adapting diploid population genetics models to polyploids
2- Theoretical mathematical models for polyploid population genetics and evolution
3- Polyploid forward-in-time and coalescent simulation models
4- Polyploid conservation and quantitative genetics
5- The effect of polyploid characters on the population level
6- Multiple origin, subdivision, gene flow and selection in polyploid populations
7- Polyploid genomic and functional genomic analytical tools
8- Opinions on the future of polyploid research


Keywords: Allopolyploids, Autopolyploids, Polyploidisation, Mathematical Biology, Simulation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

This topic has been realized, and is in collaboration with Abdulquder Jighly, pre-doctoral student (La Trobe University, Australia) as part of Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution's Mentorship Program

Polyploidisation, whole genome duplication, is a major evolutionary force that shapes the diversity of angiosperms, ferns, fish, reptiles, arthropods and amphibians lineages. Polyploids have two major classifications, allopolyploids (a hybrid of two or more distinguished genomes) and autopolyploids (resulted from multiple duplication of a single genome). Although polyploidisation is very common in nature, its effect at the population level has been poorly studied due to complexities related to the inheritance and evolution of polyploids.

In practice, the similarity among allopolyploid ancestral diploid genomes and the presence of more than two copies of each chromosome in autopolyploids make it, in most cases, impossible to infer polyploid population genetics characteristics using diploid statistical methods creating a need to develop new models especially for polyploids. Polyploidisation complexities can even influence genomic and functional genomic analyses such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, next generation sequencing (NGS) and genome editing.

This Research Topic provides a platform for scientists to share their opinions and shape the future of polyploid population genetic studies and applications. The broad aim is to throw a light on the theoretical evolutionary and population genetics of polyploids and how to exploit such information for different applications. We welcome submissions of any type in areas related but not limited to:
1- Adapting diploid population genetics models to polyploids
2- Theoretical mathematical models for polyploid population genetics and evolution
3- Polyploid forward-in-time and coalescent simulation models
4- Polyploid conservation and quantitative genetics
5- The effect of polyploid characters on the population level
6- Multiple origin, subdivision, gene flow and selection in polyploid populations
7- Polyploid genomic and functional genomic analytical tools
8- Opinions on the future of polyploid research


Keywords: Allopolyploids, Autopolyploids, Polyploidisation, Mathematical Biology, Simulation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top