Research Topic

Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential - Beyond a Simple Test of Otolith Function

About this Research Topic

The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a short-latency vestibular reflex evoked by loud sound, vibration, or electric current. Typically the cervical VEMP (cVEMP) is measured from the neck flexor/rotator sternocleidomastoid (SCM), on the ventral aspect of the neck whereas the ocular VEMP (oVEMP) is measured from extraocular muscles. However, since the cVEMP is mediated by vestibulospinal pathways, it distributes widely to many muscles throughout the body, and accordingly has been reported in other muscles including the masseter, soleus, gastrocnemius, triceps, and others. As a whole, VEMPs are part of a suite of tests that provide rapid and clinically useful information about the patency of the vestibular apparatus. Importantly though, alterations in vestibulospinal reflexes are observed clinically in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis, and as such may represent a differential diagnostic approach to these diseases beyond the typical use of the VEMP for assessment of the peripheral vestibular apparatus. Further, vestibulospinal reflexes do not operate in isolation, they are embedded within complex neural circuits that modulate the peripheral sensors and presumably allow context dependent vestibular-mediated output. This Research Topic aims to explore the current uses of the VEMP test, potential applications beyond peripheral vestibular dysfunction, as well as investigations that highlight the potential for modulation of vestibular output by other sensory systems or diverse central nervous system structures. All article types from Original Research to Reviews are welcome.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a short-latency vestibular reflex evoked by loud sound, vibration, or electric current. Typically the cervical VEMP (cVEMP) is measured from the neck flexor/rotator sternocleidomastoid (SCM), on the ventral aspect of the neck whereas the ocular VEMP (oVEMP) is measured from extraocular muscles. However, since the cVEMP is mediated by vestibulospinal pathways, it distributes widely to many muscles throughout the body, and accordingly has been reported in other muscles including the masseter, soleus, gastrocnemius, triceps, and others. As a whole, VEMPs are part of a suite of tests that provide rapid and clinically useful information about the patency of the vestibular apparatus. Importantly though, alterations in vestibulospinal reflexes are observed clinically in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis, and as such may represent a differential diagnostic approach to these diseases beyond the typical use of the VEMP for assessment of the peripheral vestibular apparatus. Further, vestibulospinal reflexes do not operate in isolation, they are embedded within complex neural circuits that modulate the peripheral sensors and presumably allow context dependent vestibular-mediated output. This Research Topic aims to explore the current uses of the VEMP test, potential applications beyond peripheral vestibular dysfunction, as well as investigations that highlight the potential for modulation of vestibular output by other sensory systems or diverse central nervous system structures. All article types from Original Research to Reviews are welcome.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2018 Manuscript

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Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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