Research Topic

Intestinal Inflammation

About this Research Topic

The gastrointestinal tract is the largest surface in mammals' body, and is in unceasing contact with a huge load of microorganisms, constituting the intestinal microbiota, and different antigens and xenobiotic coming from the diet. As such, intestinal innate and adaptive immune systems are finely regulated in order to tolerate commensal microorganisms and food-derived molecules, while maintaining the ability to mount a vigorous immune response against pathogens, followed by a prompt restoration of mucosal homeostasis.

Indeed, perturbations in these precise regulatory mechanisms may lead to the occurrence of inappropriate immune activity and/or the persistence of an inflammatory response and, thus, to the onset of intestinal diseases; in fact, several gut disorders arise from uncontrolled, chronic inflammation, as is the case for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Microscopic Colitides, Coeliac Disease and Diverticular Disease.

Several factors contribute to the development of the aforementioned clinical entities, including the composition of host microbiota, host immune system features and potential environmental stimuli, although, many pathogenetic mechanisms have yet to be completely elucidated. Undeniably, inflammatory conditions of the gut represent a significant burden for the Health Systems of Westernized countries, as treatment options are not curative and those disorders usually relapse.

Therefore, the aim of the present Research Topic is to further elucidate mechanisms leading to the onset and/or worsening of intestinal inflammation and recapitulate recent advances in the knowledge of the pathogenesis and clinical management of gut inflammatory conditions.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
• Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
• Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of Coeliac Disease
• Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of Microscopic Colitides
• Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of Diverticular Disease
• Microbiota characterization and interactions with mucosal immune system
• Biomarkers of intestinal inflammation

We would like to encourage researchers to submit original research conducted in humans or non-human models species, as well as review articles and meta-analyses. The following Frontiers article types are accepted: original research articles, mini reviews, reviews and perspectives.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The gastrointestinal tract is the largest surface in mammals' body, and is in unceasing contact with a huge load of microorganisms, constituting the intestinal microbiota, and different antigens and xenobiotic coming from the diet. As such, intestinal innate and adaptive immune systems are finely regulated in order to tolerate commensal microorganisms and food-derived molecules, while maintaining the ability to mount a vigorous immune response against pathogens, followed by a prompt restoration of mucosal homeostasis.

Indeed, perturbations in these precise regulatory mechanisms may lead to the occurrence of inappropriate immune activity and/or the persistence of an inflammatory response and, thus, to the onset of intestinal diseases; in fact, several gut disorders arise from uncontrolled, chronic inflammation, as is the case for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Microscopic Colitides, Coeliac Disease and Diverticular Disease.

Several factors contribute to the development of the aforementioned clinical entities, including the composition of host microbiota, host immune system features and potential environmental stimuli, although, many pathogenetic mechanisms have yet to be completely elucidated. Undeniably, inflammatory conditions of the gut represent a significant burden for the Health Systems of Westernized countries, as treatment options are not curative and those disorders usually relapse.

Therefore, the aim of the present Research Topic is to further elucidate mechanisms leading to the onset and/or worsening of intestinal inflammation and recapitulate recent advances in the knowledge of the pathogenesis and clinical management of gut inflammatory conditions.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
• Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
• Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of Coeliac Disease
• Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of Microscopic Colitides
• Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of Diverticular Disease
• Microbiota characterization and interactions with mucosal immune system
• Biomarkers of intestinal inflammation

We would like to encourage researchers to submit original research conducted in humans or non-human models species, as well as review articles and meta-analyses. The following Frontiers article types are accepted: original research articles, mini reviews, reviews and perspectives.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 December 2017 Manuscript
12 January 2018 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 December 2017 Manuscript
12 January 2018 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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