Research Topic

Fishing Effort and the Evolving Nature of its Efficiency

About this Research Topic

We have become efficient fishers. From our ancestors’ spears, we improved our fishing techniques by casting nets and setting traps and using our knowledge of the dynamics of water and the life that occurs in it. Boats revolutionized our access to resources and enabled us to go after preferred food species for daily subsistence beyond our shoreline. Boats enabled us to catch more than necessary for subsistence, and catching more meant we could barter fish for grain or for meat. From the moment that we realized that fishing brought revenue, the fate of the world’s marine resources was cast. Our capacity to invent efficient fishing gears and techniques is limitless, and has reached a point where we can go out to the high seas and dig into the depths of the oceans, exploiting resources previously inaccessible to us. Fishing techniques evolved over centuries. Improvements had one major objective: to catch as much as possible with as little effort as necessary. This development had both positive and negative effects, with increased catches being supplied to the world’s markets, but with the destructive aftermath of fishing operations on vulnerable marine habitats.

In this research topic, we seek to understand the evolution of fishing effort, notably in coastal artisanal fisheries. We encourage contributions that will present time-series analyses of fishing effort (for example, catch per unit of effort) by geographic region, with emphasis on fisheries that are important in these regions and their impact on coastal habitats or on the functioning of those ecosystems. We are also interested in contributions that will look at the evolution of artisanal fishing techniques (including as influenced by industrial fishing practices) over time, and their impact on coastal habitats and biodiversity. Contributions that investigate the sustainability of current levels of fishing effort and their impact on food security are particularly encouraged. Although our focus will remain with quantitative time-series analyses, we would also accept contributions that can provide historical backgrounds to trends in fishing effort, for instance, changes triggered by events inland that impact on coastal demographic trends. Finally, we would like to see more contributions from areas where fishing effort data are sparse, and where this research topic might be of greatest use.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

We have become efficient fishers. From our ancestors’ spears, we improved our fishing techniques by casting nets and setting traps and using our knowledge of the dynamics of water and the life that occurs in it. Boats revolutionized our access to resources and enabled us to go after preferred food species for daily subsistence beyond our shoreline. Boats enabled us to catch more than necessary for subsistence, and catching more meant we could barter fish for grain or for meat. From the moment that we realized that fishing brought revenue, the fate of the world’s marine resources was cast. Our capacity to invent efficient fishing gears and techniques is limitless, and has reached a point where we can go out to the high seas and dig into the depths of the oceans, exploiting resources previously inaccessible to us. Fishing techniques evolved over centuries. Improvements had one major objective: to catch as much as possible with as little effort as necessary. This development had both positive and negative effects, with increased catches being supplied to the world’s markets, but with the destructive aftermath of fishing operations on vulnerable marine habitats.

In this research topic, we seek to understand the evolution of fishing effort, notably in coastal artisanal fisheries. We encourage contributions that will present time-series analyses of fishing effort (for example, catch per unit of effort) by geographic region, with emphasis on fisheries that are important in these regions and their impact on coastal habitats or on the functioning of those ecosystems. We are also interested in contributions that will look at the evolution of artisanal fishing techniques (including as influenced by industrial fishing practices) over time, and their impact on coastal habitats and biodiversity. Contributions that investigate the sustainability of current levels of fishing effort and their impact on food security are particularly encouraged. Although our focus will remain with quantitative time-series analyses, we would also accept contributions that can provide historical backgrounds to trends in fishing effort, for instance, changes triggered by events inland that impact on coastal demographic trends. Finally, we would like to see more contributions from areas where fishing effort data are sparse, and where this research topic might be of greatest use.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Abstract
31 July 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Abstract
31 July 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top