Research Topic

Fungal Pathogenesis and Drug Resistance

About this Research Topic

Over the past few decades, frequency of invasive fungal diseases has increased enormously. The risk of fungal infection is exacerbated by indiscriminate use of broad-spectrum antibacterial drugs, immunosuppressive agents and cancer chemotherapy.

Immunocompromised populations are especially at increased risk for susceptibility to several opportunistic fungal diseases including candidiasis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, and cryptococcosis. Despite the efficacy of old and new antifungal drugs against these diseases, rapidly emerging drug resistance has become a major concern for treatment of such patients. This increase in fungal infections in the last few decades has almost directly paralleled the increase and widespread use of a broad range of medical implant devices, such as stents, shunts, prostheses, implants, endotracheal tubes, pacemakers and various types of catheters. In fact, studies of catheter-related fungal infections, especially Candida infection, have unequivocally shown that retention of vascular catheters is associated with prolonged fungemia, high antifungal therapy failure rates, increased risk of metastatic complications and death.

In the past, systematic approaches to study fungal molecular characteristics, fungal interaction with the host, and identification of virulence determinants, have largely been successful in recognizing the underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis. These strategies have also assisted in identifying novel drug targets and immunotherapeutic interventions.

We welcome you to submit your potential manuscripts on studies of virulence properties of pathogenic fungi, such as adhesion, morphogenetic switching, biofilm formation and host cell damage. The genes and signaling pathways underlying the virulence traits, and the environmental factors (pH, heat, carbon sources, oxygen) modulating them, will also be considered desirable for review. Finally, reports on mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance (intrinsic, acquired or biofilm), and identification of potential new antifungal drugs or drug targets, will be within the scope of the current research topic.


Keywords: pathogenesis, resistance, biofilms, immunology, signaling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Over the past few decades, frequency of invasive fungal diseases has increased enormously. The risk of fungal infection is exacerbated by indiscriminate use of broad-spectrum antibacterial drugs, immunosuppressive agents and cancer chemotherapy.

Immunocompromised populations are especially at increased risk for susceptibility to several opportunistic fungal diseases including candidiasis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, and cryptococcosis. Despite the efficacy of old and new antifungal drugs against these diseases, rapidly emerging drug resistance has become a major concern for treatment of such patients. This increase in fungal infections in the last few decades has almost directly paralleled the increase and widespread use of a broad range of medical implant devices, such as stents, shunts, prostheses, implants, endotracheal tubes, pacemakers and various types of catheters. In fact, studies of catheter-related fungal infections, especially Candida infection, have unequivocally shown that retention of vascular catheters is associated with prolonged fungemia, high antifungal therapy failure rates, increased risk of metastatic complications and death.

In the past, systematic approaches to study fungal molecular characteristics, fungal interaction with the host, and identification of virulence determinants, have largely been successful in recognizing the underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis. These strategies have also assisted in identifying novel drug targets and immunotherapeutic interventions.

We welcome you to submit your potential manuscripts on studies of virulence properties of pathogenic fungi, such as adhesion, morphogenetic switching, biofilm formation and host cell damage. The genes and signaling pathways underlying the virulence traits, and the environmental factors (pH, heat, carbon sources, oxygen) modulating them, will also be considered desirable for review. Finally, reports on mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance (intrinsic, acquired or biofilm), and identification of potential new antifungal drugs or drug targets, will be within the scope of the current research topic.


Keywords: pathogenesis, resistance, biofilms, immunology, signaling


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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