Research Topic

Dyadic Coping

About this Research Topic

Dyadic coping is a concept that has reached increased attention in psychological science within the last 20 years. Dyadic coping conceptualizes the way couples cope with stress together in sharing appraisals of demands, planning together how to deal with the stressors and engage in supportive or joint dyadic coping. Among the different theories of dyadic coping, the Systemic Transactional Model (STM) has been applied to many studies on couples’ coping with stress. While a recent meta-analysis shows that dyadic coping is a robust and consistent predictor of relationship satisfaction and couple’s functioning in community samples, some studies also reveal the significance of dyadic coping in dealing with psychological disorders (e.g., depression) or severe illness (e.g., cancer).

Researchers all over the world build their research on this or other concepts of dyadic coping and many typically use the Dyadic Coping Inventory (DCI) for assessing dyadic coping. So far, research on dyadic coping has been systematically presented in two books, one written by Revenson, Kayser, & Bodenmann in 2005 focussing on emerging perspectives on couples’ coping, the other by Falconier, Randall, & Bodenmann more recently in 2016 addressing intercultural aspects of dyadic coping in African, American, Asian and European couples.

This Research Topic will examine dyadic coping in different areas, highlighting new research on dyadic coping in basic research as well as clinical and intervention studies. We aim to make visible most recent studies on dyadic coping:

(a) in various research domains such as health psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, personality psychology,
(b) different cultures and ethnicities,
(c) different age groups (adolescent couples, adult couples, elderly couples),
(d) different stressors (chronic illness, psychological disorders, critical life events, daily hassles, financial strain, transition to parenthood, transition to retirement),
(e) assessing predictors of dyadic coping (e.g., motivation, physiology, personality traits),
(f) assessing processes of dyadic coping (sequences, dynamics, slopes) and
(g) using new methods (experiments, daily diaries, EAR, videotaped interaction coding, State-Space-Grids, etc.).

The state-of-the-art in dyadic coping research shall be highlighted by a broad variety of contributions representing the different evolutions in the field.


Keywords: Dyadic coping, Dyadic appraisals, Dyadic goals, Couple Support, Spousal support


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Dyadic coping is a concept that has reached increased attention in psychological science within the last 20 years. Dyadic coping conceptualizes the way couples cope with stress together in sharing appraisals of demands, planning together how to deal with the stressors and engage in supportive or joint dyadic coping. Among the different theories of dyadic coping, the Systemic Transactional Model (STM) has been applied to many studies on couples’ coping with stress. While a recent meta-analysis shows that dyadic coping is a robust and consistent predictor of relationship satisfaction and couple’s functioning in community samples, some studies also reveal the significance of dyadic coping in dealing with psychological disorders (e.g., depression) or severe illness (e.g., cancer).

Researchers all over the world build their research on this or other concepts of dyadic coping and many typically use the Dyadic Coping Inventory (DCI) for assessing dyadic coping. So far, research on dyadic coping has been systematically presented in two books, one written by Revenson, Kayser, & Bodenmann in 2005 focussing on emerging perspectives on couples’ coping, the other by Falconier, Randall, & Bodenmann more recently in 2016 addressing intercultural aspects of dyadic coping in African, American, Asian and European couples.

This Research Topic will examine dyadic coping in different areas, highlighting new research on dyadic coping in basic research as well as clinical and intervention studies. We aim to make visible most recent studies on dyadic coping:

(a) in various research domains such as health psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, personality psychology,
(b) different cultures and ethnicities,
(c) different age groups (adolescent couples, adult couples, elderly couples),
(d) different stressors (chronic illness, psychological disorders, critical life events, daily hassles, financial strain, transition to parenthood, transition to retirement),
(e) assessing predictors of dyadic coping (e.g., motivation, physiology, personality traits),
(f) assessing processes of dyadic coping (sequences, dynamics, slopes) and
(g) using new methods (experiments, daily diaries, EAR, videotaped interaction coding, State-Space-Grids, etc.).

The state-of-the-art in dyadic coping research shall be highlighted by a broad variety of contributions representing the different evolutions in the field.


Keywords: Dyadic coping, Dyadic appraisals, Dyadic goals, Couple Support, Spousal support


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

05 June 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

05 June 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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