Research Topic

Insights into the Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment of Food Allergy

About this Research Topic

Allergic diseases affect up to one third of individuals in the developed world during their lifetime, causing severe loss in the quality of life and a significant burden on healthcare services. Food allergy is a growing public health concern affecting almost 6-8% in children and 3-5% in adults with life-threatening potential. The increased prevalence of food allergy in recent years has implicated environmental influences related to a modern life style in disease pathogenesis.

Food allergy can be defined as clinical immune responses to normally harmless food allergens. The disease is typically associated with CD4+ T cells that secrete pathogenic T helper (Th) 2 cytokines, and by allergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E antibodies that trigger the release of inflammatory mediators from mast cells and circulating basophils. An aberrant response to food allergens can also be non-IgE-mediated. Normally, ingestion of foods results in oral tolerance and therefore, food allergy is thought to be a result of a failure of oral tolerance. Recent studies have suggested that alterations in (i) regulatory T cell functions, (ii) Th2 responses, (iii) microbiota, and/or (iv) food sensitization via alternative routes, such as the skin, are likely contribute to the failure of oral tolerance and to the development of food allergy. However, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown in oral tolerance remain poorly understood.

There is currently no cure for food allergy, other than strict avoidance of identified foods. Key problems in this field that remain to be resolved are our (i) insufficient understanding of the mechanisms of the breakdown in oral tolerance in food allergy and (ii) our lack of understanding of the reasons why such mechanisms have recently taken such a strong basis within the human population. We are at an exciting point in time in which discoveries about the etiology, mechanisms, treatment, and prevention of food allergy are critical for guiding future areas of research and identifying therapeutic options for food allergic patients.

In this Research Topic, we aim to provide an overview of recent progress in our understanding of food allergy. We welcome the submission of Reviews, Mini-Reviews, Original Research, and Clinical Trial articles that cover, but are not limited to, the following topics:

1. Environmental and genetic risk factors for food allergy.
2. Mechanisms of food allergy: effector immune cells involved in the initiation, development and manifestations of disease.
3. Regulatory immune mechanisms in tolerance against food allergy.
4. Prevention and treatment of food allergy.
5. Eosinophilic esophagitis and food allergy.


Keywords: Food allergy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Allergic diseases affect up to one third of individuals in the developed world during their lifetime, causing severe loss in the quality of life and a significant burden on healthcare services. Food allergy is a growing public health concern affecting almost 6-8% in children and 3-5% in adults with life-threatening potential. The increased prevalence of food allergy in recent years has implicated environmental influences related to a modern life style in disease pathogenesis.

Food allergy can be defined as clinical immune responses to normally harmless food allergens. The disease is typically associated with CD4+ T cells that secrete pathogenic T helper (Th) 2 cytokines, and by allergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E antibodies that trigger the release of inflammatory mediators from mast cells and circulating basophils. An aberrant response to food allergens can also be non-IgE-mediated. Normally, ingestion of foods results in oral tolerance and therefore, food allergy is thought to be a result of a failure of oral tolerance. Recent studies have suggested that alterations in (i) regulatory T cell functions, (ii) Th2 responses, (iii) microbiota, and/or (iv) food sensitization via alternative routes, such as the skin, are likely contribute to the failure of oral tolerance and to the development of food allergy. However, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown in oral tolerance remain poorly understood.

There is currently no cure for food allergy, other than strict avoidance of identified foods. Key problems in this field that remain to be resolved are our (i) insufficient understanding of the mechanisms of the breakdown in oral tolerance in food allergy and (ii) our lack of understanding of the reasons why such mechanisms have recently taken such a strong basis within the human population. We are at an exciting point in time in which discoveries about the etiology, mechanisms, treatment, and prevention of food allergy are critical for guiding future areas of research and identifying therapeutic options for food allergic patients.

In this Research Topic, we aim to provide an overview of recent progress in our understanding of food allergy. We welcome the submission of Reviews, Mini-Reviews, Original Research, and Clinical Trial articles that cover, but are not limited to, the following topics:

1. Environmental and genetic risk factors for food allergy.
2. Mechanisms of food allergy: effector immune cells involved in the initiation, development and manifestations of disease.
3. Regulatory immune mechanisms in tolerance against food allergy.
4. Prevention and treatment of food allergy.
5. Eosinophilic esophagitis and food allergy.


Keywords: Food allergy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Abstract
31 May 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Abstract
31 May 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top