Research Topic

Biologically Inspired Microrobots

About this Research Topic

In seeking nutrients efficiently, microorganisms undergo different locomotion mechanisms. For example, peritrichously flagellated Escherichia coli swim by wrapping their flagella together in a helical bundle. The continuous rotation of this bundle enables locomotion and swimming back-and-forth. The Escherichia coli tumble whenever its necessary to change the swimming direction. In the pursuit of autonomous locomotion at micro-and nano-scales, researchers have mimicked and adapted swimming strategies of motile cells. Sperm cells show fascinating microswimmer abilities during their long distance journey towards the ovum in highly viscous media. Flagellated cells are fascinating as models and components of microrobots because they have evolved over millions of years to function efficiently on the nano- and microscale in the low Reynolds number regime. The purpose of biologically inspired microbiorobotics is either to mimic the motion of biological components or to use whole cells or their components to create functional hybrid microrobots.

We are interested in the design, fabrication, locomotion, and motion control of biologically inspired microrobots. We are also fascinated by their diverse biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This Research Topic aims to bring together advances in the field of microrobotics from engineering, material science, physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology and medicine. We look forward to receiving submissions in the forms of Original Research, Reviews, Hypothesis and Theory, Technology Reports and Perspective type articles.


Keywords: Low Reynolds Numbers, microrobots, external actuation, self-propulsion


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In seeking nutrients efficiently, microorganisms undergo different locomotion mechanisms. For example, peritrichously flagellated Escherichia coli swim by wrapping their flagella together in a helical bundle. The continuous rotation of this bundle enables locomotion and swimming back-and-forth. The Escherichia coli tumble whenever its necessary to change the swimming direction. In the pursuit of autonomous locomotion at micro-and nano-scales, researchers have mimicked and adapted swimming strategies of motile cells. Sperm cells show fascinating microswimmer abilities during their long distance journey towards the ovum in highly viscous media. Flagellated cells are fascinating as models and components of microrobots because they have evolved over millions of years to function efficiently on the nano- and microscale in the low Reynolds number regime. The purpose of biologically inspired microbiorobotics is either to mimic the motion of biological components or to use whole cells or their components to create functional hybrid microrobots.

We are interested in the design, fabrication, locomotion, and motion control of biologically inspired microrobots. We are also fascinated by their diverse biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This Research Topic aims to bring together advances in the field of microrobotics from engineering, material science, physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology and medicine. We look forward to receiving submissions in the forms of Original Research, Reviews, Hypothesis and Theory, Technology Reports and Perspective type articles.


Keywords: Low Reynolds Numbers, microrobots, external actuation, self-propulsion


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

22 December 2017 Abstract
27 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

22 December 2017 Abstract
27 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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