Research Topic

Drug Development and Target Discovery in Pulmonary Vascular Diseases

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Pulmonary vascular disease is a broad category of disorders caused by abnormal blood flow between the heart and the lungs, which is threatening millions of people around the world. Pulmonary vascular disorders include acute and chronic thromboembolic disease (blood clot), pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary ...

Pulmonary vascular disease is a broad category of disorders caused by abnormal blood flow between the heart and the lungs, which is threatening millions of people around the world. Pulmonary vascular disorders include acute and chronic thromboembolic disease (blood clot), pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Novel strategies for prevention and treatment targeting these diseases are not only a major clinical issue, but a scientific challenge faced by pharmacologists worldwide that needs to be addressed urgently

With the emergence of high-throughput, high-content screening, and drug virtual screening technologies in the past two decades, the development of pharmacology took a "great leap forward". In recent years, the rapid development of modern life sciences, especially "omics" (pharmacogenomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics), has brought new opportunities for enrichment and convey pharmacological connotations, as well as new challenges to pharmacologists. In order to achieve precise drug development and precise drug therapy, the action and mechanisms of drugs and drug interactions within the body need to be fully elucidated from different perspectives and dimensions in pulmonary vascular biology. Therefore, the study of pulmonary vascular pharmacology needs to be integrated with various rapidly-developing life analysis technologies, especially the analysis of life-omics, which would further reveal the multidimensional scientific issues of the interaction between drug molecules and target molecules in pulmonary vascular diseases.

Here, we welcome the latest research advances focusing on “Drug Development and Target Discovery in Pulmonary Vascular Diseases”, including the discovery of new candidate compounds targeting pulmonary vascular diseases in basic and clinical pharmacology, as well as active components in traditional pharmaceutical ingredients using high-throughput screening strategies, high-content screening strategies, and virtual molecular docking techniques. We also welcome research exploring new therapeutic targets and mechanisms of drug action, taking advantage of the "omics" mentioned above. We believe that focusing on the development of drugs and the discovery of drug targets will deepen our understanding and insights of pulmonary vascular diseases, and will also significantly promote the development of pulmonary vascular pharmacology.


Keywords: Pulmonary Vascular Diseases, Drug Development, Target Discovery, High-Throughput Screening, "Omics"


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