Research Topic

Radon in Human Environments

About this Research Topic

Radon is a naturally occurring, colorless, odorless, chemically inert, and radioactive gas. Until the late 1970s, it was thought that elevated indoor radon concentrations were an isolated concern, associated with the inadvertent presence of certain industrial and mining residues in or near buildings. It is now widely understood that the most important component of radiation exposure to the public is due to the inhalation of radon decay products indoor. Long term exposure to these higher concentrations leads to individual risks of lung cancer that are so high, as to be unacceptable by almost any standard. Nowadays, concerns about radon exposure are focused on living environments and some workplaces with elevated concentration of radon and its progenies.

The main aspects of this Research Topic addresses the essential role of the possible sources of radon indoors. The main source is the soil beneath the building envelope. The soil is permeable enough to allow radon to migrate into a home through the slab, basement, or crawlspace. There are pathways for the radon to enter the basement, such as small holes, cracks, plumbing penetrations, or sumps. Building materials and potable water could be additional sources that increase radon concentration into homes. Radon (222Rn) and its short-lived progeny (218Po, 214Po, 214Bi, 214Pb) are attached in dust and in water droplets creating radioactive aerosols, that inhaled via breathing and enter human lungs. All homes have radon entry pathways; an air pressure difference between the basement or crawlspace and the surrounding soil draws radon into the home. Due to the variety and differences in construction details worldwide, the various types of soil and the living conditions of different populations, the problem of radon must be considered in detail.

This Research Topic is expected to be an overview of the current research carried out on:

1. Parameters affecting Radon and Progenies entrance and presence in living and working environments.
2. Building and constructive details to protect the public from the high concentration indoors.
3. Factors affecting radiation expose and dose delivered by man as well as health risk associated with radon and progenies existence in living environments.

Analysis has found that radon can easily be drawn away from buildings to help prevent it from entering the home through the use of construction interventions in new and old buildings where the problem is found. Prevention of radon and the distribution of its decay products in indoor air is of major importance for a healthy environment. Air exchange rates, indoor aerosols, and synergistic phenomena are in consideration for this Topic. Household water could transfer soluble radon into homes and as a result, it escapes in the indoor air through various water uses.

We welcome original research articles, surveys, methods articles, reviews, mini-reviews, or perspective articles.


Keywords: radon, health, impact, indoor air, workplaces, occupational health, dose, expose


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Radon is a naturally occurring, colorless, odorless, chemically inert, and radioactive gas. Until the late 1970s, it was thought that elevated indoor radon concentrations were an isolated concern, associated with the inadvertent presence of certain industrial and mining residues in or near buildings. It is now widely understood that the most important component of radiation exposure to the public is due to the inhalation of radon decay products indoor. Long term exposure to these higher concentrations leads to individual risks of lung cancer that are so high, as to be unacceptable by almost any standard. Nowadays, concerns about radon exposure are focused on living environments and some workplaces with elevated concentration of radon and its progenies.

The main aspects of this Research Topic addresses the essential role of the possible sources of radon indoors. The main source is the soil beneath the building envelope. The soil is permeable enough to allow radon to migrate into a home through the slab, basement, or crawlspace. There are pathways for the radon to enter the basement, such as small holes, cracks, plumbing penetrations, or sumps. Building materials and potable water could be additional sources that increase radon concentration into homes. Radon (222Rn) and its short-lived progeny (218Po, 214Po, 214Bi, 214Pb) are attached in dust and in water droplets creating radioactive aerosols, that inhaled via breathing and enter human lungs. All homes have radon entry pathways; an air pressure difference between the basement or crawlspace and the surrounding soil draws radon into the home. Due to the variety and differences in construction details worldwide, the various types of soil and the living conditions of different populations, the problem of radon must be considered in detail.

This Research Topic is expected to be an overview of the current research carried out on:

1. Parameters affecting Radon and Progenies entrance and presence in living and working environments.
2. Building and constructive details to protect the public from the high concentration indoors.
3. Factors affecting radiation expose and dose delivered by man as well as health risk associated with radon and progenies existence in living environments.

Analysis has found that radon can easily be drawn away from buildings to help prevent it from entering the home through the use of construction interventions in new and old buildings where the problem is found. Prevention of radon and the distribution of its decay products in indoor air is of major importance for a healthy environment. Air exchange rates, indoor aerosols, and synergistic phenomena are in consideration for this Topic. Household water could transfer soluble radon into homes and as a result, it escapes in the indoor air through various water uses.

We welcome original research articles, surveys, methods articles, reviews, mini-reviews, or perspective articles.


Keywords: radon, health, impact, indoor air, workplaces, occupational health, dose, expose


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

07 October 2018 Abstract
14 December 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

07 October 2018 Abstract
14 December 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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