Research Topic

Linking Neuroinflammation and Glial Phenotypic Changes in Neurological Diseases

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About this Research Topic

Glial cells, a major population of cells in the human nervous system, play a critical role in mediating neuroinflammation and have been demonstrated to be tightly associated with neuronal alteration. They take the responsibility for maintaining homeostasis in the CNS, by regulating neurogenesis and ...

Glial cells, a major population of cells in the human nervous system, play a critical role in mediating neuroinflammation and have been demonstrated to be tightly associated with neuronal alteration. They take the responsibility for maintaining homeostasis in the CNS, by regulating neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, modulating neuronal excitability and shaping synaptic connectivity. However, dysfunctional glial cells contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism and psychiatric disorders. Different types of glial cells including microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes possess different functions and crosstalk with each other. An increasing number of studies have focused on the phenotypic variants of glial cells (such as M1/M2 microglia and A1/A2 astrocytes) to define their detrimental or neuroprotective effects. However, the versatile functions of glial cells in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases are still in debate, especially with the advent of single-cell RNA-Seq analysis. Their role is more likely to be heterogeneous and context dependent. With the help of newly developed techniques, their functions are underway to be fully revealed.

In this Research Topic, we are seeking to collect original research papers that will discuss the functions of multiple glia types in neurological diseases, in link with glial phenotypic changes with combined variables, such as age, neuropathological conditions and stages of the disease. We also welcome studies on glial function using high-throughput detection and bioinformatics analysis. We furthermore encourage the submission of any type of manuscript related with neuroinflammation in neurological diseases, including original research and review articles.

Subtopics:
1. Microglial phenotypes and neuroinflammation
2. Astrocyte phenotypes and neuroinflammation
3. Linking oligodendrocytes and myelin dysfunction with neuroinflammation
4. Glia & glia crosstalk; Glia & neurons crosstalk
5. Novel methods/techniques for studying glial functions
6. Glia-mediated neuroinflammation and pathological gene mutations
7. Glia-mediated neuroinflammation and aging
8. Novel mechanisms of neuroprotection


Keywords: glia, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, phenotypic change, neurological diseases, neuroprotection


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