Research Topic

Canine Hip and Elbow Dysplasia Improvement Programs Around the World: Success or Failure?

About this Research Topic

Canine hip (CHD) and elbow dysplasia (ED) are inherited, non-congenital orthopedic diseases that are particularly prevalent in large and giant breeds of dog. Since the 1960s, the recommended veterinary approach for CHD and later for ED has been diagnosis and selective breeding with the aim to reduce disease ...

Canine hip (CHD) and elbow dysplasia (ED) are inherited, non-congenital orthopedic diseases that are particularly prevalent in large and giant breeds of dog. Since the 1960s, the recommended veterinary approach for CHD and later for ED has been diagnosis and selective breeding with the aim to reduce disease prevalence in the canine populations.

Therefore, many countries in the world, over the last 50 years, have implemented different CHD and ED improvement programs.

The diagnosis of CHD or ED is made if characteristic radiographic signs are evident on standard or stressed views of the pelvis or elbow; the severity of the dysplasia being based on a gradual scale from nearly normal to severely affected. Studies attempting to find genetic markers for these diseases are now frequent but have very limited practical application. Imaging diagnosis continues to be of major importance for disease screening.

There are reports of CHD and ED improvement programs with different strategies. The goal of this Research topic is to provide a set of tools to analyze and improve screening programs by adapting the best aspects of programs to improve future success.

The Research Topic seeks a range of contribution that will assist is the understanding, implementation, evaluation and development of both CHD and ED improvement schemes. Such contributions may include reviews of current progress, descriptions and comparisons of screening strategies, and experiences from other screening schemes relevant to the overall aim of reducing the prevalence of CHD and ED.


Keywords: Canine, Hip, Elbow, Dysplasia, Screening


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 September 2019 Manuscript
31 December 2019 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 September 2019 Manuscript
31 December 2019 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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