Research Topic

Recent Advances in the Controversial Human Pathogens Pneumocystis, Microsporidia and Blastocystis

About this Research Topic

Pneumocystis spp. are ubiquitous atypical fungi that develop extracellularly in the alveolar cavities of mammalian lungs with a not-completely defined lifecycle. Similarly, microsporidia are a diverse group (>1,400 species) of obligate intracellular fungi, with a broad range of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts and poorly understood mechanisms of invasion, growth and reproduction. Blastocystis spp. are ubiquitous anaerobic eukaryotes that have a unique phylogenetic origin but are widely present in various mammals, including humans. All these organisms have environmental stages required for the initiation of new hosts’ infection, and were previously considered protozoa. Further controversies remain on the species structure, zoonotic potential, transmission routes, and pathogenicity/clinical significance of each organisms group. Recently, with the development of various molecular tools for identification and characterization and the availability of whole genome sequences, metagenomics tools, animal models and/or cultivation, significant progresses have been made in our understanding of the biology and epidemiology of these controversial pathogens. The present effort summaries relevant researches in this area and highlights the potential of new tools and approaches in resolving some longstanding issues regarding these three groups of neglected and opportunistic pathogens.

This Research Topic welcomes contributions dissecting the following issues:
1. Genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and genetic manipulation of the three pathogens mentioned earlier.
2. Host-pathogen interactions, pathogenicity, and immunology.
3. Molecular taxonomy, detection/diagnosis/typing, and molecular epidemiology.
4. Metabolism, drug discovery, and treatment.

The following article types are particularly welcomed: original research, research notes, reviews, and case reports.

We welcome and encourage authors to submit their contributions to this exciting Research Topic.


Keywords: Pneumocystis, Microsporidia, Blastocystis, opportunistic eukaryotes, controversial pathogens


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Pneumocystis spp. are ubiquitous atypical fungi that develop extracellularly in the alveolar cavities of mammalian lungs with a not-completely defined lifecycle. Similarly, microsporidia are a diverse group (>1,400 species) of obligate intracellular fungi, with a broad range of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts and poorly understood mechanisms of invasion, growth and reproduction. Blastocystis spp. are ubiquitous anaerobic eukaryotes that have a unique phylogenetic origin but are widely present in various mammals, including humans. All these organisms have environmental stages required for the initiation of new hosts’ infection, and were previously considered protozoa. Further controversies remain on the species structure, zoonotic potential, transmission routes, and pathogenicity/clinical significance of each organisms group. Recently, with the development of various molecular tools for identification and characterization and the availability of whole genome sequences, metagenomics tools, animal models and/or cultivation, significant progresses have been made in our understanding of the biology and epidemiology of these controversial pathogens. The present effort summaries relevant researches in this area and highlights the potential of new tools and approaches in resolving some longstanding issues regarding these three groups of neglected and opportunistic pathogens.

This Research Topic welcomes contributions dissecting the following issues:
1. Genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and genetic manipulation of the three pathogens mentioned earlier.
2. Host-pathogen interactions, pathogenicity, and immunology.
3. Molecular taxonomy, detection/diagnosis/typing, and molecular epidemiology.
4. Metabolism, drug discovery, and treatment.

The following article types are particularly welcomed: original research, research notes, reviews, and case reports.

We welcome and encourage authors to submit their contributions to this exciting Research Topic.


Keywords: Pneumocystis, Microsporidia, Blastocystis, opportunistic eukaryotes, controversial pathogens


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

17 May 2019 Abstract
14 September 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

17 May 2019 Abstract
14 September 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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