Research Topic

Enhancing Natural Regeneration to Restore Landscapes

About this Research Topic

There is an urgent need to restore landscapes across the tropics. It can be achieved through different approaches (ranging from improved management to tree planting) and have distinct goals, including recovery of carbon stocks, biodiversity and agricultural productivity. Natural regeneration of the original vegetation after it has been removed in deforested landscapes is central to many restoration efforts. Restoration efforts making use of natural regeneration can be from fully passive like in case of secondary succession on fallowed land, but can also be actively managed. Active tree planting is often a means to enhance natural regeneration to guarantee self-sustainability over time. management of natural regeneration in fallows through pruning, selective weeding or, enrichment planting, restores ecosystem functioning and may enhance crop productivity. How natural regeneration can be enhanced/ managed to meet restoration goals is largely unknown, it will depend on socio-economic, biophysical and landscape contexts and on the specific restoration targets.

With this Research Topic we aim to conceptualise the role of natural regeneration practices for restoration and to advance the knowledge on the ecological and socio-economic enabling conditions as well as on how management practices can accelerate the recovery of different functions in different contexts.

In this Research Topic we are particularly interested in (i) how and where natural regeneration can help restoring landscapes, (ii) understanding the biophysical and anthropogenic conditions that enhance or preclude natural regeneration, (iii) how to manage natural regeneration to achieve different restoration goals, (iv) how restoration processes differ in dry and wet ecosystems and across regions, (v) what can we learn from theoretical ecology on secondary succession to help design effective restoration approaches.

We aim for a global coverage across the Pantropics. Submissions from regions that are underrepresented in restoration science and from early career scientists are especially welcome. Different types of articles are welcome, including Original Research, Perspectives, and Mini Reviews. Please find a complete list of article types here.


Keywords: Restoration, Agroforestry systems, Secondary succession, Natural regeneration, Fallows


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

There is an urgent need to restore landscapes across the tropics. It can be achieved through different approaches (ranging from improved management to tree planting) and have distinct goals, including recovery of carbon stocks, biodiversity and agricultural productivity. Natural regeneration of the original vegetation after it has been removed in deforested landscapes is central to many restoration efforts. Restoration efforts making use of natural regeneration can be from fully passive like in case of secondary succession on fallowed land, but can also be actively managed. Active tree planting is often a means to enhance natural regeneration to guarantee self-sustainability over time. management of natural regeneration in fallows through pruning, selective weeding or, enrichment planting, restores ecosystem functioning and may enhance crop productivity. How natural regeneration can be enhanced/ managed to meet restoration goals is largely unknown, it will depend on socio-economic, biophysical and landscape contexts and on the specific restoration targets.

With this Research Topic we aim to conceptualise the role of natural regeneration practices for restoration and to advance the knowledge on the ecological and socio-economic enabling conditions as well as on how management practices can accelerate the recovery of different functions in different contexts.

In this Research Topic we are particularly interested in (i) how and where natural regeneration can help restoring landscapes, (ii) understanding the biophysical and anthropogenic conditions that enhance or preclude natural regeneration, (iii) how to manage natural regeneration to achieve different restoration goals, (iv) how restoration processes differ in dry and wet ecosystems and across regions, (v) what can we learn from theoretical ecology on secondary succession to help design effective restoration approaches.

We aim for a global coverage across the Pantropics. Submissions from regions that are underrepresented in restoration science and from early career scientists are especially welcome. Different types of articles are welcome, including Original Research, Perspectives, and Mini Reviews. Please find a complete list of article types here.


Keywords: Restoration, Agroforestry systems, Secondary succession, Natural regeneration, Fallows


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

10 May 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

10 May 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..