Research Topic

Neural Mechanisms of Memory Retrieval and Its Links to Other Cognitive Processes

About this Research Topic

Memory retrieval allows us to re-immerse ourselves in previous experiences. Prior neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have shown that memory retrieval evokes the neural representations that were elicited during the encoding. However, other studies suggest that while retrieval and encoding share at least some of the same neural substrate, they also engage distinct neural mechanisms and involve different network dynamics. Thus, these findings suggest that memory retrieval is more than a simple reactivation of the actual experience.

Memory retrieval is also known to be closely related to other cognitive processes such as working memory and the memory updating system. Prior research has suggested that retrieved information is brought back into working memory in a similar format of the initial representation of new perceptual inputs. Memory reconsolidation studies suggest that retrieval triggers memory reorganization, allowing the original memory traces to be updated. Thus, retrieval is not the final stage of the memory processes, passively re-accessing what has been learned, but instead might trigger changes to the stored memory itself.

With this Research Topic, we aim to bring together various neuroimaging, electrophysiology, computational modeling, and behavioral studies, as well as reviews and opinions on memory retrieval.
All contributions addressing the following topics are welcome;
the neural mechanisms of memory retrieval: common and differential neural substrates associated with encoding and retrieval; the relationship between memory retrieval and working memory; memory reconsolidation/updating, and other relevant research.


Keywords: Memory, Retrieval, Working memory, Reconsolidation, Encoding


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Memory retrieval allows us to re-immerse ourselves in previous experiences. Prior neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have shown that memory retrieval evokes the neural representations that were elicited during the encoding. However, other studies suggest that while retrieval and encoding share at least some of the same neural substrate, they also engage distinct neural mechanisms and involve different network dynamics. Thus, these findings suggest that memory retrieval is more than a simple reactivation of the actual experience.

Memory retrieval is also known to be closely related to other cognitive processes such as working memory and the memory updating system. Prior research has suggested that retrieved information is brought back into working memory in a similar format of the initial representation of new perceptual inputs. Memory reconsolidation studies suggest that retrieval triggers memory reorganization, allowing the original memory traces to be updated. Thus, retrieval is not the final stage of the memory processes, passively re-accessing what has been learned, but instead might trigger changes to the stored memory itself.

With this Research Topic, we aim to bring together various neuroimaging, electrophysiology, computational modeling, and behavioral studies, as well as reviews and opinions on memory retrieval.
All contributions addressing the following topics are welcome;
the neural mechanisms of memory retrieval: common and differential neural substrates associated with encoding and retrieval; the relationship between memory retrieval and working memory; memory reconsolidation/updating, and other relevant research.


Keywords: Memory, Retrieval, Working memory, Reconsolidation, Encoding


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2020 Abstract
31 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2020 Abstract
31 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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