Research Topic

Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: From Epidemiological Findings to Neurobiological Underpinnings of Treatment Response and Outcome

About this Research Topic

Young people seeking help for clinical high risk (CHR) symptoms have a high risk of developing a psychotic disorder, developing other mental disorders, or experiencing persistent psychosocial deficits accompanied by a reduction in quality of life (QoL). This phase of presentation offers an excellent starting point for indicated prevention that, currently, aims at reducing CHR symptoms and, possibly, preventing transition to frank psychosis and enabling progression to non-psychotic outcomes. To improve the outcome from CHR states and to prevent psychosis, a better understanding of the association between epidemiological data and neurobiological underpinnings with symptomatic and functional outcomes (including QoL) is crucial. Despite advancements in the understanding of CHR states and psychosis, many risk factors and the relevance of neurobiology for the outcome of treatment options (e.g. QoL) remain poorly understood. Furthermore, knowledge on predictors and risk factors, as well as alterations in brain structure and function related to CHR states and psychosis, have the potential to individualize treatment recommendations.

The aim of this Research Topic is to highlight and promote recent research focusing on the epidemiology and neurobiology of CHR states and psychosis onset, new treatment options as well as the consequences on patients’ QoL. Studies highlighting cutting edge research to help gain further clinical insight into CHR states and psychosis and their outcome would be given priority.

Both original research and review studies in young individuals with CHR states for psychosis or a first-episode of a psychotic disorder across the age range of 8 to 40 years will be welcomed. We especially encourage contributions focusing on:

• recent advances in epidemiological findings of CHR and
psychosis
• neurobiological underpinnings (functional, connectivity and
structural
neuroimaging) of treatment response and outcome
• brain chemistry (e.g. neuroinflammation) related to CHR and
psychosis
• risk factors, predictors and neurobiological underpinnings of CHR
states and psychosis
• therapeutic interventions for CHR states and their consequences
on QoL
• systemic biomarkers relevant to neurobiology (e.g. immune
activation, oxidative stress etc.)
• longitudinal studies focusing on quality of life as outcome (e.g.
treatment studies)
• biological treatment options for CHR and psychosis (e.g. omega-
3-fatty acids)


Keywords: Clinical high risk, Psychosis, Neurobiology, Epidemiology, Quality of Life


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Young people seeking help for clinical high risk (CHR) symptoms have a high risk of developing a psychotic disorder, developing other mental disorders, or experiencing persistent psychosocial deficits accompanied by a reduction in quality of life (QoL). This phase of presentation offers an excellent starting point for indicated prevention that, currently, aims at reducing CHR symptoms and, possibly, preventing transition to frank psychosis and enabling progression to non-psychotic outcomes. To improve the outcome from CHR states and to prevent psychosis, a better understanding of the association between epidemiological data and neurobiological underpinnings with symptomatic and functional outcomes (including QoL) is crucial. Despite advancements in the understanding of CHR states and psychosis, many risk factors and the relevance of neurobiology for the outcome of treatment options (e.g. QoL) remain poorly understood. Furthermore, knowledge on predictors and risk factors, as well as alterations in brain structure and function related to CHR states and psychosis, have the potential to individualize treatment recommendations.

The aim of this Research Topic is to highlight and promote recent research focusing on the epidemiology and neurobiology of CHR states and psychosis onset, new treatment options as well as the consequences on patients’ QoL. Studies highlighting cutting edge research to help gain further clinical insight into CHR states and psychosis and their outcome would be given priority.

Both original research and review studies in young individuals with CHR states for psychosis or a first-episode of a psychotic disorder across the age range of 8 to 40 years will be welcomed. We especially encourage contributions focusing on:

• recent advances in epidemiological findings of CHR and
psychosis
• neurobiological underpinnings (functional, connectivity and
structural
neuroimaging) of treatment response and outcome
• brain chemistry (e.g. neuroinflammation) related to CHR and
psychosis
• risk factors, predictors and neurobiological underpinnings of CHR
states and psychosis
• therapeutic interventions for CHR states and their consequences
on QoL
• systemic biomarkers relevant to neurobiology (e.g. immune
activation, oxidative stress etc.)
• longitudinal studies focusing on quality of life as outcome (e.g.
treatment studies)
• biological treatment options for CHR and psychosis (e.g. omega-
3-fatty acids)


Keywords: Clinical high risk, Psychosis, Neurobiology, Epidemiology, Quality of Life


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

23 June 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

23 June 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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