Research Topic

Modulators of Cross-Language Influences in Learning and Processing

About this Research Topic

Cross-language influence (CLI), also termed transfer, has been demonstrated to affect language learning and processing in multilinguals. Rather than merely documenting the presence of such CLI, the current research topic focuses on exploring factors that might modulate the degree and nature of CLI, namely for which multilinguals CLI might be more or less evident.

Specifically, we target two types of possible modulators.
• First, learner characteristics such as proficiency, age, and the interactional context of language use can influence the extent of CLI.
• Second, individual differences in domain general cognitive abilities (e.g. working memory, cognitive control) and/or in linguistic abilities (e.g. meta-linguistic awareness, number of previously known languages) may modulate the degree of CLI.

We welcome papers examining the impact of these modulators of CLI, across a wide range of language domains (phonology, lexicon, grammar) and tasks (oral, written, signed). Given the central importance of CLI in determining multilingual performance, a deeper understanding of its modulators will undoubtedly lead to fascinating theoretical and practical advances.


Keywords: Bilingualism, multilingualism, SLA, transfer, CLI


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cross-language influence (CLI), also termed transfer, has been demonstrated to affect language learning and processing in multilinguals. Rather than merely documenting the presence of such CLI, the current research topic focuses on exploring factors that might modulate the degree and nature of CLI, namely for which multilinguals CLI might be more or less evident.

Specifically, we target two types of possible modulators.
• First, learner characteristics such as proficiency, age, and the interactional context of language use can influence the extent of CLI.
• Second, individual differences in domain general cognitive abilities (e.g. working memory, cognitive control) and/or in linguistic abilities (e.g. meta-linguistic awareness, number of previously known languages) may modulate the degree of CLI.

We welcome papers examining the impact of these modulators of CLI, across a wide range of language domains (phonology, lexicon, grammar) and tasks (oral, written, signed). Given the central importance of CLI in determining multilingual performance, a deeper understanding of its modulators will undoubtedly lead to fascinating theoretical and practical advances.


Keywords: Bilingualism, multilingualism, SLA, transfer, CLI


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

10 January 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

10 January 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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