Research Topic

Synthetic Biology of Yeasts for the Production of Non-Native Chemicals

About this Research Topic

Yeasts are now considered as attractive microbial cell factories for the production of a wide range of bulk and fine chemicals including biofuels, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, fragrances, additives, pigments, and so on. Yeasts are easy to manipulate and scale-up, and have a short generation and production time. The metabolic engineering of, and construction of novel pathways in, yeasts is needed to make robust cell factories in order to produce the desired chemicals at high titer, rate, and yield. Tools of synthetic biology, such as computational tools for metabolic modeling and pathway design, synthesis and assembly of standardized biobricks, powerful genome editing methods and optimization of synthetic pathways, have been developed to improve the metabolic engineering of yeasts and construction of novel pathways for the production of non-native chemicals in a faster and more reliable manner without any additional metabolic burden.

This Research Topic is intended to collect Original Research articles, Method articles, Technology Reports, Reviews, Mini-reviews, Perspective and Opinion articles. These articles will cover recent advances in the metabolic engineering of yeasts via synthetic pathways and rewiring metabolism. The construction of new, non-existing pathways in yeasts will be particularly focused on in this collection. Potential bottlenecks, key challenges and future research trends in order to develop robust engineered yeast biorefineries for the sustainable and cost-effective production of various non-native chemicals will also be looked at in the Research Topic. It should be noted that optimization of natural pathways by metabolic engineering tools will not be considered in this Research Topic.

The following topic areas to be included, but not limited to, in this Research Topic are:

• New and synthetic pathways in yeasts for non-native chemicals production
• Recent advances in non-native chemical production by metabolic engineered yeasts
• Bottlenecks and key challenges in synthetic biology of yeasts for cost-effective production of chemicals
• Future research trends to access the sustainable production of chemicals by constructed and engineered yeasts


Keywords: Synthetic Biology, Yeast, Metabolic Engineering, Bulk and Fine Chemicals, Biotechnology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Yeasts are now considered as attractive microbial cell factories for the production of a wide range of bulk and fine chemicals including biofuels, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, fragrances, additives, pigments, and so on. Yeasts are easy to manipulate and scale-up, and have a short generation and production time. The metabolic engineering of, and construction of novel pathways in, yeasts is needed to make robust cell factories in order to produce the desired chemicals at high titer, rate, and yield. Tools of synthetic biology, such as computational tools for metabolic modeling and pathway design, synthesis and assembly of standardized biobricks, powerful genome editing methods and optimization of synthetic pathways, have been developed to improve the metabolic engineering of yeasts and construction of novel pathways for the production of non-native chemicals in a faster and more reliable manner without any additional metabolic burden.

This Research Topic is intended to collect Original Research articles, Method articles, Technology Reports, Reviews, Mini-reviews, Perspective and Opinion articles. These articles will cover recent advances in the metabolic engineering of yeasts via synthetic pathways and rewiring metabolism. The construction of new, non-existing pathways in yeasts will be particularly focused on in this collection. Potential bottlenecks, key challenges and future research trends in order to develop robust engineered yeast biorefineries for the sustainable and cost-effective production of various non-native chemicals will also be looked at in the Research Topic. It should be noted that optimization of natural pathways by metabolic engineering tools will not be considered in this Research Topic.

The following topic areas to be included, but not limited to, in this Research Topic are:

• New and synthetic pathways in yeasts for non-native chemicals production
• Recent advances in non-native chemical production by metabolic engineered yeasts
• Bottlenecks and key challenges in synthetic biology of yeasts for cost-effective production of chemicals
• Future research trends to access the sustainable production of chemicals by constructed and engineered yeasts


Keywords: Synthetic Biology, Yeast, Metabolic Engineering, Bulk and Fine Chemicals, Biotechnology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

12 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

12 August 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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