Research Topic

Zoonotic Diseases: Their Hosts and Vectors

About this Research Topic

The concept of the ‘One Health’ approach involving collaboration between veterinary and medical scientists, policy makers, and public health officials, is necessary to foster joint cooperation and control of emerging zoonotic diseases. Zoonotic diseases caused by a wide range of arthropods, bacteria, helminths, protozoans, and viruses can cause serious and even life-threatening clinical conditions in animals, with a number of them also affecting the human population due to their zoonotic potential.

The main zoonoses are related to interactions between domestic animals and wildlife, as well as between dogs and cats and human populations. Humans are accidentally infected in endemic areas, where animals act as reservoirs and the climate conditions favour the proliferation of vectors. The influence of others variables, such as temperature, humidity, irrigated areas, the introduction of new vector species, climate change, human activity in new areas, the activities of medical and veterinary personnel, travel with pets to endemic countries, and the presence of the disease in areas not previously described as endemic are important outcomes to consider in the establishment of new zoonotic diseases in areas where they had not previously been described.

Most of these diseases are neglected diseases despite causing a problem that can be global in scale. Different studies are necessary to prevent and control these diseases with control programs against both sources and their reservoirs.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to cover recent and novel research trends in zoonotic diseases. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include (though are not limited to) the following:

• Relationships between human population, domestic animals and wildlife
• The role of invasive alien species.
• Epidemiology of zoonotic infections.
• Control strategies, monitoring, and treatment/prevention control methods.
• Dynamics of vectors, vector life cycles, and immune response in the hosts.
• Relevant proteomic and molecular studies.

Types of manuscripts welcomed include Original Research, Report, Reviews, Mini-Reviews, and Case Report articles.

Topic Editor Rubén Bueno Marí is employed by Lokimica Laboratorios. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Zoonotic disease, vector-borne disease, parasite, animal, human


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The concept of the ‘One Health’ approach involving collaboration between veterinary and medical scientists, policy makers, and public health officials, is necessary to foster joint cooperation and control of emerging zoonotic diseases. Zoonotic diseases caused by a wide range of arthropods, bacteria, helminths, protozoans, and viruses can cause serious and even life-threatening clinical conditions in animals, with a number of them also affecting the human population due to their zoonotic potential.

The main zoonoses are related to interactions between domestic animals and wildlife, as well as between dogs and cats and human populations. Humans are accidentally infected in endemic areas, where animals act as reservoirs and the climate conditions favour the proliferation of vectors. The influence of others variables, such as temperature, humidity, irrigated areas, the introduction of new vector species, climate change, human activity in new areas, the activities of medical and veterinary personnel, travel with pets to endemic countries, and the presence of the disease in areas not previously described as endemic are important outcomes to consider in the establishment of new zoonotic diseases in areas where they had not previously been described.

Most of these diseases are neglected diseases despite causing a problem that can be global in scale. Different studies are necessary to prevent and control these diseases with control programs against both sources and their reservoirs.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to cover recent and novel research trends in zoonotic diseases. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include (though are not limited to) the following:

• Relationships between human population, domestic animals and wildlife
• The role of invasive alien species.
• Epidemiology of zoonotic infections.
• Control strategies, monitoring, and treatment/prevention control methods.
• Dynamics of vectors, vector life cycles, and immune response in the hosts.
• Relevant proteomic and molecular studies.

Types of manuscripts welcomed include Original Research, Report, Reviews, Mini-Reviews, and Case Report articles.

Topic Editor Rubén Bueno Marí is employed by Lokimica Laboratorios. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Zoonotic disease, vector-borne disease, parasite, animal, human


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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